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I have this simple code here, nothing too advanced.

    $("input#send").submit(function(event){
      event.preventDefault();
    $.ajax({
        type: 'POST',
        url: add.php,
        data: data,
        success: success,
        dataType: dataType
    });
});

Whever I click on the "send" button, the event.preventDefault function doesn't work, and the page loads.

Any ideas why?

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

A form has the submit event, not a button. Plus, an ID should be unique so tag#id can just be #id.

$("#theform").submit(function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    // ...
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that worked. May I ask, I used the click function on the button earlier, but it didn't seem to work that way either? Why is that? – Peter Stuart Dec 16 '11 at 21:35
    
@Peter Stuart: What exactly do you mean? Putting click on the submit button works too: jsfiddle.net/rKJJU. – pimvdb Dec 16 '11 at 21:37
2  
@PeterStuart I think it's because you didn't put quotes around add.php, see my answer below. I agree with @pimvdb's advice about putting the event handler on the form itself, because you can also invoke a form submit with the enter key via the keyboard. – jessegavin Dec 16 '11 at 21:40

You need to bind to the form's submit event or to the button's click event and call event.preventDefault() if you want to stop the form from submitting:

$('form').bind('submit', function (event) {
    event.preventDefault();
});

$('form').find(':submit').bind('click', function (event) {
    event.preventDefault();
});
share|improve this answer

I believe the submit event is for the form element. For an input[type='button] you might want to use the click event.

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  1. Add quotes around 'add.php'
  2. Change the selector in the first line to the id attribute of the form which contains input#send.

The advantage of handling the submit() handler on the form rather than the click handler on the input is that some forms can be submitted by pressing the enter key (when the user is focused on one of the form fields). If you don't have an id attribute, add one or use a different jQuery selector to target the form tag.

$("#myform").submit(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $.ajax({
        type: 'POST',
        url: 'add.php',
        data: data,
        success: success,
        dataType: dataType
    });
    return false;
});
share|improve this answer

Try using return false instead

$("input#send").submit(function(event) {
    $.ajax({
        type: 'POST',
        url: add.php,
        data: data,
        success: success,
        dataType: dataType
    });
    return false;
});
share|improve this answer
2  
Should not make a difference. – Felix Kling Dec 16 '11 at 21:33
1  
return false in a jQuery event handler is the same as calling event.preventDefault(); event.stopPropagation(); – Jasper Dec 16 '11 at 21:35
1  
I had tried that, it didn't work because of the ajax. it worked if I put it above the ajax code, but not after it. Thanks anyway :) – Peter Stuart Dec 16 '11 at 21:36
    
@peter that was exactly my issue! thanks a lot :) – pastrami01 Aug 14 '15 at 16:01

If you're using preventDefault I assume that means you do NOT want the default submit action. I would just use a different event instead of using .submit. To me, it's not the submit action that you want to intercept, but rather the click that would normally cause the submit.

$('#inputSend').on('click', function(event) {
  event.preventDefault();
  //the rest
});
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