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Is it possible to set a different font-size according to font availability?

Currently my problem is that Verdana is too big, and if the user don't have Verdana installed, I will end up with a very small font-size

Is there is any way to set a font (Verdana in my case) to 13px and if the user don't have that font installed, try with another font (Arial for example) but with bigger font-size?

Notes:

  • Preferably CSS only
  • CSS hacks allowed
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The question is, are there computers out there that have Arial, but not Verdana. According to this, that scenario is unlikely. –  Šime Vidas Dec 16 '11 at 22:55
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I'm with @ŠimeVidas - I wouldn't worry too much about people not having Verdana - those cases will be very rare. –  ptriek Dec 16 '11 at 22:58
    
@ŠimeVidas, I understand this scenario is unlikely, but what if someone else want to do this with other fonts that are likely to don't be installed by default? –  ajax333221 Dec 16 '11 at 22:59
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@ajax333221 Consider rephrasing the question, so that it becomes more general. For instance, the title could be "How to detect font availability and set the font-size accordingly?"... –  Šime Vidas Dec 16 '11 at 23:04
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There is no CSS only solution. –  thirtydot Feb 5 '12 at 6:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

As was answered just a minute ago by someone else (but already deleted?), you could use Font Detector Javascript solution:

http://jsfiddle.net/FHnJw/1

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It is really cool, I will use it if nobody finds a CSS way to achieve this (I know it is very unlikely, I already lost all hope someone will find the CSS way to do this) –  ajax333221 Dec 16 '11 at 23:23
    
It's very unlikely, indeed - it would require that CSS somehow would be able to detect the font used/installed - and as far as I know CSS is just for styling... –  ptriek Dec 16 '11 at 23:27
    
And could you please give me an upvote? I guess Fernando couldn't resist a downvote :-) –  ptriek Dec 16 '11 at 23:31
    
no prob, you're right about that. i just thought the -1 was a bit unfair, too :-) –  ptriek Dec 17 '11 at 0:32
    
I was going to post a different JS solution, that does essentially the same thing. This is what you're looking for, OP. I haven't found a CSS-only solution to this issue. You can, however, use the JS test to create classes on say, your HTML or BODY tags, then you can do all your styling decisions in your CSS by referencing those classes. –  mkoistinen Dec 17 '11 at 17:43

This might take some work to implement (I have not ever actually done it myself), but it seems that the font-size-adjust property helps "equalize" font's by standardizing the x-height. See http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-fonts/#propdef-font-size-adjust for the official description.

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Font-size adjust only works with Firefox

The standalone 'font' css declaration only allows you to state font-size, style and weight once before declaring the different font families in succession so that's a no-go either

I'm sorry to say this cannot be done through css alone

As for the JS alternative, here's the one I recommend:

http://www.lalit.org/lab/javascript-css-font-detect/

Good luck

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