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I have a sql statement like this (using mysql 5.5.15):

select global_id, count(id) as group_count
from globals_lists
group by global_id
order by group_count desc;

and would like to modify it to support a subset with an in statement like this:

select global_id, count(id) as group_count
from globals_lists
where global_id in (3,4,5,6)
group by global_id
order by group_count desc;

I'll get as a result:

global_id   group_count
3           15 
5           12

but would like

global_id   group_count
3           15 
5           12
4           0
6           0

Is this possible? I tried a couple of having clauses but couldn't seem to get it working.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's a little awkward looking, but how about?

select IDs.ID, ifnull(count(globals_lists.global_id),0) as group_count
from (select 3 as ID
             UNION select 4
             UNION select 5
             UNION select 6) as IDs
left join globals_lists on IDs.ID = globals_lists.global_id
group by IDs.ID
order by group_count desc;
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I was afraid of something like this –  timpone Dec 16 '11 at 23:00
    
count(*) will return 1 for a row that's not matched by the left join. Count a column from the global_lists table instead of *. –  Andomar Dec 16 '11 at 23:02
    
@Andomar - Great catch –  Brian Hoover Dec 16 '11 at 23:03
    
any scaling concerns beyond a standard join with this? There's a lot more to this query and might just handle the non-returned values in ruby –  timpone Dec 16 '11 at 23:12

You could add a table with all desired values. Either inline, like below, or in a temporary table. Then you can use left join to match the number of rows.

select  lst.nr
,       count(gl.id) as group_count
from    (
        select 3 as nr
        union all select 4
        union all select 5
        union all select 6
        ) lst
left join 
        globals_lists gl
on      lst.nr = gl.global_id
group by 
        lst.nr
order by 
        count(gl.id) desc
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is there any performance concerns with a query like this beyond a standard join? –  timpone Dec 16 '11 at 23:11

Instead of COUNT(id), use COUNT(*) so it will return a count even if there are none, assuming 4 & 6 do exist:

select global_id, count(*) as group_count
from globals_lists
where global_id in (3,4,5,6)
group by global_id
order by group_count desc;
share|improve this answer
    
is there a solution if 5 and 6 don't exist? –  timpone Dec 16 '11 at 22:59
    
@timpone Yes, you need to UNION together the other literals. Looks like it has been answered by another... –  Michael Berkowski Dec 16 '11 at 23:00

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