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For example, I have:

char* a = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char));
char* b = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char*));

How do I get the address of a into memory starting at address b?

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why do you need this? –  SlavaNov Dec 16 '11 at 23:00
2  
what do you want to achieve? What you're doing here (for variable b) is allocating space for one "pointer to char", and assigning that to a variable of type pointer to char; I think you're confusing the variable type and the type this variable points to here; usually the notion for a "pointer to char" is to point to "char" values, not "pointer to char" ones... –  codeling Dec 16 '11 at 23:00
    
Basically I want to have a recursive structure, the pointer is needed to indicate that it is a free slot, and the contents after the pointer should point to the next pointer, which points to the next free slot etc. It is kind of like a linked list. –  Stackd Dec 16 '11 at 23:47

4 Answers 4

If you want b to point to a pointer to char (as could be deduced by looking at your malloc statement, where you allocate space for one pointer to char), then b should actually be of type pointer to pointer to char, like this:

char*  a = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char));
char** b = (char**)malloc(sizeof(char*));

As far as I understood, what you want to achieve is to assign the address a is pointing to to the place b is pointing to? That would look like this then:

*b = a;

If you instead just want b to be a pointer to char (as you actually declared b), and want it to point to the same address as a, then do this:

char* a = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char));
char* b = a;

That makes b point to the same location as a; but then you also don't need to allocate space for b, because they simply point to the same address on the heap. You'll have to take care however, that you also only free the space pointed to by a and b once!

I'd also suggest reading up on the idea of pointers (e.g. here or here).

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Let me preface this by saying that, since b is actually going to point to a char*, you should really declare and initialize it this way:

char** b = (char**) malloc(sizeof(char*));

using char** instead of char*. But if you already know that, and still want b to have type char* for some reason, then you'd just write this:

*((char**) b) = a;

which treats b as though it were a char**, so you can store a char* in it.

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This is not what i want, I want to be able to store the contents in the bytes after b. Basically I want to have a recursive structure, the pointer is needed to indicate that it is a free slot, and the contents after the pointer should point to the next pointer, which points to the next free slot etc. –  Stackd Dec 16 '11 at 23:45

Depends on what you need (it's not fully clear), you can do b = a, *b = &a (literally as you asked, the address of a into memory starting at address b), or *b = a.

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*b = a wont actually store the address because an address is 4 bytes long, while sizeof(*b) is 1 byte. The first thing I dont want. –  Stackd Dec 17 '11 at 10:37

Couldn't you just do a *b = a? Or am I misunderstanding the question?

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It would be *a = &b –  Seth Carnegie Dec 16 '11 at 23:01
    
Wouldn't *b = a truncate stuff ? –  cnicutar Dec 16 '11 at 23:02
    
but he wants to put the pointer memory location(a) into the spot pointed to by b (*b) no? so *b = a; Good point, it may truncate. Time to test it! –  SuperTron Dec 16 '11 at 23:03

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