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Can anyone tell me what is wrong with the following code?

__inline__
char* ut_byte_to_long (ulint nb) {

   char* a = malloc(sizeof(nb)); 
   int i = 0;
   for (i=0;i<sizeof(nb);i++) {
       a[i] = (nb>>(i*8)) & 0xFF;
   }
   return a; 
}

This string is then concatenated as part of a larger one using strcat. The string prints fine but for the integers which are represented as character symbols. I'm using %s and fprintf to check the result.

Thanks a lot.

EDIT

I took one of the comments below (I was adding the terminating \0 separately, before calling fprintf, but after strcat. Modifying my initial function...

__inline__
char* ut_byte_to_long (ulint nb) {

   char* a = malloc(sizeof(nb) + 1); 
   int i = 0;
   for (i=0;i<sizeof(nb);i++) {
       a[i] = (nb>>(i*8)) & 0xFF;
   }
   a[nb] = '\0' ; 
   return a; 
}

This sample code still isn't printing out a number...

char* tmp;
tmp = ut_byte_to_long(start->id);

fprintf(stderr, "Value of node is %s \n ", tmp);
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1  
"string"? ??? Where's the terminating zero byte? –  pmg Dec 16 '11 at 23:36
1  
You're only breaking up the number nb into bytes (in little endian), so it's a binary format not compatible with strings/text. You're bound to have some zero bytes in there if you choose small numbers though. –  u0b34a0f6ae Dec 16 '11 at 23:40
1  
For your question: Specify what kind of conversion you want. To display text (then this approach is wrong)? To little endian byte string (then this approach is close)? –  u0b34a0f6ae Dec 16 '11 at 23:43
    
Why is this tagged C++? There is nothing C++ about this code... –  Ed S. Dec 16 '11 at 23:43
    
@kaizer.se: I want to display this number as text. This code is part of a larger thing of representing a tree as a string. –  user1018513 Dec 17 '11 at 0:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

if you dont want to use sprintf(target_string,"%lu",source_int) or the non standard itoa(), here is a version of the function that transform a long to a string :

__inline__
char* ut_byte_to_long (ulint nb) {
    char* a = (char*) malloc(22*sizeof(char));  
    int i=21;
    int j;
    do
    {
        i--;
        a[i] = nb % 10 + '0';
        nb = nb/10; 
    }while (nb > 0);
    // the number is stored from a[i] to a[21]

    //shifting the string to a[0] : a[21-i]
    for(j = 0 ; j < 21 && i < 21 ; j++ , i++)
    {
        a[j] = a[i];
    }
    a[j] = '\0';
    return a;
}

I assumed that an unsigned long contain less than 21 digits. (biggest number is 18,446,744,073,709,551,615 which equals 2^64 − 1 : 20 digits)

share|improve this answer

strcat is expecting a null byte terminating the string.

Change your malloc size to sizeof(nb) + 1 and append '\0' to the end.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I was doing that before doing the strcat. Modifying the intiial function to what you suggested, it still doesn't work. :( –  user1018513 Dec 17 '11 at 0:00

You have two problems.

The first is that the character array a contains numbers, such as 2, instead of ASCII codes representing those numbers, such as '2' (=50 on ASCII, might be different in other systems). Try modifying your code to

a[i] = (nb>>(i*8)) & 0xFF + '0';

The second problem is that the result of the above computation can be anything between 0 and 255, or in other words, a number which requires more than one digit to print.

If you want to print hexadecimal numbers (0-9, A-F), two digits per such computation will be enough, and you can write something like

a[2*i + 0] = int2hex( (nb>>(i*8)) & 0x0F );   //right hexa digit
a[2*i + 1] = int2hex( (nb>>(i*8+4)) & 0x0F ); //left hexa digit

where

char int2hex(int n) {
  if (n <= 9 && n >= 0)
    return n + '0';
  else
    return (n-10) + 'A';
}
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