Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given an object initialized like so:

Base* a = new Derived();
Container<Base> c(a);

where

class Base {
  ...
  protected:
    ~Base();
}

class Derived : public Base {...};

template <typename T>
class Container {
  private:
    T* object;

  public:
    Container(T* o) : object(o) {}
    void deleteObject() {
      delete object;  // Object must be casted to (unknown) derived type to call destructor.
    }
};

Obviously this is very simplified from the actual code, but the question is how do I cast object from its templated type to its actual, derived type (if they are different), which is not known?

I cannot modify Base or Derived, or even any of the code calling Container, only the Container class itself.

share|improve this question
1  
What's the question? –  Adam Zalcman Dec 17 '11 at 0:00
1  
If you cannot modify Base atleast, you're kinda screwed. –  Xeo Dec 17 '11 at 0:01
3  
Fix Base. A polymorphic base class without a virtual destructor is a bug. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '11 at 0:12
2  
Making things challenging is all good and dandy - making things unsolvable is just fucking stupid. –  Xeo Dec 17 '11 at 0:26
1  
Make Container take second template parameter Derived (since you can modify Container): Container<Base,Derived> and use static_cast to cast the pointer. –  Petr Budnik Dec 17 '11 at 0:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're able to change the creation code, you might get away with this:

template<class T>
void deleter(void* p){
  delete static_cast<T*>(p);
}

template<class T>
class Container{
private:
  T* obj;
  typedef void (*deleter_func)(void*);
  deleter_func obj_deleter;

public:
  Container(T* o, deleter_func df)
    : obj(o), obj_deleter(df) {}
  void deleteObject(){ obj_deleter(obj); }
};

And in the calling code:

Base* a = new Derived();
Container<Base> c(a, &deleter<Derived>);
share|improve this answer
    
I can't change Base or Derived. I'll update my question stating so. –  Andrew Marshall Dec 17 '11 at 0:00
    
@Andrew: Changed the answer. –  Xeo Dec 17 '11 at 0:06
    
My problem ended up morphing a bit from what I asked here, and was thus solved in a different way; sorry for all the confusion around it. I like this answer the best of what's here though given the problem I did ask. –  Andrew Marshall Dec 17 '11 at 4:55
    
You said you can only change Container, and can't change the code calling Container. I take it you've relaxed this second bit? i.e. you allow that the call to construct Container now takes two parameters, the object and its deleter. –  Aaron McDaid Dec 18 '11 at 19:13

Hint (since this is homework): Look up the keyword virtual.

share|improve this answer
    
I know about virtual, but I cannot change Base or Derived, so that doesn't help. –  Andrew Marshall Dec 17 '11 at 0:02
2  
Then I wish you the very best of luck! ☻ –  Johnsyweb Dec 17 '11 at 0:04

If you cannot change both the Base or Derived or make the destructor virtual, you can make the deleteObject a template function

template <typename T>
class Container {
  private:
    T* object;

  public:
    Container(T* o) : object(o) {}


    template <typename U>
    void deleteObject() {
      U* c = static_cast<U*>(object);
      delete c;
    }
};


int main(void)
{
    Base* a = new Derived();
    Container<Base> *b = new Container<Base>(a);


    b->deleteObject<Derived>();
        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1. This assumes that we know the correct type at deletion. The whole point of this question is that we have a pointer b where it isn't obvious what it's real type is. –  Aaron McDaid Dec 17 '11 at 1:24
    
@AaronMcDaid The virtual destructor solution is the most logical solution. This is just one of the other solutions correct within the constraints of the question –  parapura rajkumar Dec 18 '11 at 18:13
    
This answer breaks the rules. It says "I cannot modify Base or Derived, or even any of the code calling Container, only the Container class itself." You have changed main, whereas we are only allowed to change the code in Container. –  Aaron McDaid Dec 18 '11 at 19:10
    
The question wad edited considerably since I answered it –  parapura rajkumar Dec 18 '11 at 21:40

You need to template the constructor and store a type-erased deleter. This is how shared_ptr does it.

template <typename T>
class Container {
  private:
    T* object;
    std::function<void(T*)> deleter;
  public:
    template<typename U> Container(U* o) : object(o) {
        deleter = [](T* ptr) { delete static_cast<U*>(ptr); };
    }
    void deleteObject() {
        deleter(object);
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Won't work if he only gets a Base* passed in, which is what I was hinting at in my comment. –  Xeo Dec 17 '11 at 0:15
    
Shouldn't it be deleter = []() { delete static_cast<U*>(o); }; ? –  Aaron McDaid Dec 17 '11 at 1:10
    
This uses lambdas, a C++11 feature. Is it possible to answer this without lambdas? –  Aaron McDaid Dec 17 '11 at 1:18
    
@AaronMcDaid: No, that would involve unnecessary overhead. I made a mistake in the calling code. You could use a static member function for a similar effect.# –  Puppy Dec 17 '11 at 11:51
    
@Xeo: If the Container only ever sees Base*, then there's nothing it can do to magically determine the correct type. –  Puppy Dec 17 '11 at 11:52

EDIT: I didn't realize you cannot modify Container signature as well...

If you can modify your deleteObject:

template <typename T>
class Container {
  private:
    T* object;

  public:
    Container(T* o) : object(o) {}
    template< typename PDerived >
    void deleteObject() {
      delete static_cast< PDerived* >( object ); 
    }
};

Base* a = new Derived();
Container<Base> c(a);

c.deleteObject<Derived>();

EDIT: Someone posted same solution earlier.

share|improve this answer
    
-1: We don't know what c contains a Derived. The whole point of this exercise is that the developer can't simply call c.deleteObject<Derived>(); –  Aaron McDaid Dec 17 '11 at 1:25
    
@AaronMcDaid Well, he said he can modify Container, just not the calling code he showed. Anyway, I don't really care that you -1 it, but it just too bad you don't see that every single answer in this topic supplies Derived as a explicit template parameter one way or another. Without Base being virtual or without specifying Derived somehow as template parameter explicitly, you won't get it working unless you use knowledge about object memory layout which is not guaranteed to be portable across compilers. –  Petr Budnik Dec 17 '11 at 2:38
    
Nobody's perfect. As far as I was aware, it is normal on StackOverflow to tell people that you have downvoted and to give a reason to do so. Perhaps the question is pretty much unsolvable. It might be better to highlight that the question, as asked, is not possible (in any reasonably sane/portable) way. One either needs to use virtual or else one needs to make changes to the way Container is called. i.e. This requirement (from the question) must be relaxed: I cannot modify Base or Derived, or even any of the code calling Container, And I've just tried to undo my downvote. –  Aaron McDaid Dec 17 '11 at 12:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.