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jQuery has a new method called on() that is recommended to replace delegate(), live(), and .bind().

For example, using both methods:

$('#some-button').on('click', function() {
    //do something when #some-button is clicked
});
$('#some-button').live('click', function() {
    //do something when #some-button is clicked
});

Which one performs better? (I do know that both of these event contexts are at the document level.)

share|improve this question
1  
Best way to find out is to time it. – Blender Dec 17 '11 at 0:56
    
The first one performs better because you are binding the handler directly to the element (as opposed to the document root). You are comparing apple and oranges. The closer you bind the handler to the target element, the earlier it is executed. Whether this his an impact on the performance of your application depends on it itself and on the DOM tree you are working with. – Felix Kling Dec 17 '11 at 0:58
    
Also important is that ".live()" is kind-of dumb because jQuery has to actually build up the list of elements for the selector in the original call, but then that list of elements is essentially ignored. The ".live()" API was a bad design basically and ever since the introduction of ".delegate()" there has been no reason to use it. – Pointy Dec 17 '11 at 1:03
1  
JSPerf is an easy way to time the execution of code without creating your own loops. Here is an example I made to answer your question: jsperf.com/jquery-live-vs-on – Jasper Dec 17 '11 at 1:20
up vote 11 down vote accepted

As I understand .live() and .on(), the two examples you have included do not so the same thing.

Your first one:

$('#some-button').on('click', function() {
    //do something when #some-button is clicked
});

does not have a live behavior. It finds the #some-button object and installs an event handler on it directly. This is very efficient, but does not have .live() behavior. If the #some-button object does not exist at this time, no event handler will be installed ever. It is basically the same as this:

$('#some-button').click(function() {
    //do something when #some-button is clicked
});

Your second one:

$('#some-button').live('click', function() {
    //do something when #some-button is clicked
});

has live behavior. It installs an event handler on the document and waits for clicks targeted to an object that matches "#some-button" to bubble up to the document object. Your second one is theoretically equivalent to this:

$(document).on('click', '#some-button', function() {
    //do something when #some-button is clicked
});

I say theoretically equivalent because it should install the same event handlers, but I don't know if the jQuery code for processing the two is identical or not.

One of the reasons that .live() has been deprecated is that it can be a bad thing to have a lot of .live() handlers because you get a lot of event handlers on the document object. Then, every click or even mousemove that bubbles up to the document object has to be checked against a LOT of selectors which can really slow things down.

Another issue with .live() is that it evaluates the selector "#some-button" at the time you make the call, but doesn't actually use that result so it's wasteful. The .on() version doesn't evaluate the selector passed as an argument to .on() when you make the first call because it isn't needed at that time - it's only need later when an actual click comes in that has to be compared to the selector.

With the advent of .on() (or something you could previously do with .delegate()), you can target your "live" event handlers more efficiently by not putting them all on the document object, but rather putting them on a parent object that does not come and go and is a lot closer to where the real objects are such as this:

$('#some-button-parent').on('click', '#some-button', function() {
    //do something when #some-button is clicked ///////
});

This spreads the event handlers out to different objects and gets them closer to the actual objects for which they are meant meaning you don't end up with this giant list of event handlers that have to be checked against selectors on every mousemove or click event. That's why .live() has been replaced and deprecated. It's much better to use .delegate() or .on() and specify a parent object that isn't as far away as the document object.

The advantage of the new .on() syntax is that you can do both "live" and "static" event handlers with the same method now, just by varying how you pass the arguments. The jQuery object is where the event handler will be installed and the optional selector in the second argument is a selector that the event target must match. If you pass that selector, then all events hitting the object(s) specified in the jQuery object will have their target checked against that selector. If there is no selector, then only objects who's target is the same as the object specified in the jQuery object will be matched.

So, this is all the theory about how they work and why one configuration is supposed to be better than another. If you want to test real world performance, you'd have to devise some sort of performance test on event handler propagation and distribution probably in a scenario where you had a lot of "live" event handlers. That test is probably not easy to do because it may be hard to get timing info on the start/end of an event handler. You can't easily use a tool like jsperf for something like this.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice answer. Thank you! – trusktr Dec 17 '11 at 1:25

Here is a performance test you can run in your own browser to see which is faster: http://jsperf.com/jquery-live-vs-on

The example you use with .on() and .live() are not functionally the same, here is a list of how .on(), .delegate(), and .live() work respectively:

$(<selector>).on(<event>, <handler>) is the same functionally as: $(<selector>).bind(<event>, <handler>).

$(<root-element>).on(<event>, <selector>, <handler>) is the same functionally as: $(<root-element>).delegate(<selector>, <event>, <handler>).

$(<selector>).live(<event>, <handler>) is the same functionally as $(document).delegate(<selector>, <event>, <handler>) which is the same functioanlly as: $(document).on(<event>, <selector>, <handler>).

As you can see .live() is basically the same as .delegate() however .delegate() offers the ability to change the <root element> to something other than document.

This is all explained in the jQuery docs:

As of jQuery 1.7, the .live() method is deprecated. Use .on() to attach event handlers. Users of older versions of jQuery should use .delegate() in preference to .live().

Source: http://api.jquery.com/live

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Thanks, I didn't know about jsperf. And nice functionality comparisons. – trusktr Dec 17 '11 at 1:27

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