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So I have made a bunch of user controls in my project which integrate into a system automatically that tracks certain things about them. But I'm unsure on how to do a certain part without it looking really ugly.

All the Controls are extended from different Control types (Panel, Textbox, Combobox, etc) but have several of the exact same methods.

What I would like to do is avoid this:

public void SendMyMessage(Control thisControl)
{
    if(thisControl is myPanel) (thisControl as myPanel).SendMessage();
    else if(thisControl is myComboBox) (thisControl as myComboBox).SendMessage();
    else if(thisControl is myTextbox) (thisControl as myTextbox).SendMessage();
    else if(thisControl is myLabel) (thisControl as myLabel).SendMessage();
}

And would rather have a more simple method that would let me call that in 1 line. (Noting that the SendMessage() function I am calling does different things on different controls, but requires no arguments and is called the same way)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would suggest to implement something like IMessageSender interface in all your controls. So you can have only one check:

if (thisControl is IMessageSender)
  (thisControl as IMessageSender).SendMessage();

where interface looks like this:

public interface IMessageSender
{
  void SendMessage();
}
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Why do you use both 'is' and than 'as'? I would do 'is' + 'cast' or just do 'as' once and then check for null. –  Andrew Bezzub Dec 17 '11 at 2:02
    
Cos this optimization has no relation to the original question ;) –  Restuta Dec 17 '11 at 2:05
    
All ways look messy to me. I hate all of them equally and settle with is-as –  Corylulu Dec 17 '11 at 2:44
    
This will work perfect. Thanks. –  Corylulu Dec 17 '11 at 2:44

Put the message into an interface, and have all of the controls implement the interface.

Your method can then just use the interface directly, and will work with any of the controls.

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