Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to Java. Below is a code as an example of threads and synchronization.

public class A implements Runnable{
    public synchronized void run(){

        /*
        some code here
         */

    }
}

public class B {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        A obj1 = new A();
        Thread t = new Thread(obj1);
        A obj2 = obj1;
        Thread t1 = new Thread(obj2);
        t.start();
        t1.start();
    }
}

Now will this two threads block each other for same lock or will they get two different locks?

Thank you!!

share|improve this question
2  
Why don't you run the code yourself and find the answer to your question? –  Paul Dec 17 '11 at 1:57
    
@Paul - because that won't give a definitive answer. It will tell you that it looks like one thread blocks the other, each time you run it. But doesn't tell the OP that there is actual blocking going on (as distinct from some other hypothetical mechanism that the OP isn't aware of), or that the blocking always happens. –  Stephen C Dec 17 '11 at 2:13
1  
@Paul - what I'm trying to say is that treating synchronization as a black box and trying to figure out how to use it experimentally is not a sound approach. You are liable to get all sorts of false notions ... that will bite you later on. –  Stephen C Dec 17 '11 at 2:16
    
@StephenC, it would be better for him to run it, see what happens, come up with some thoughts on what's going on, test those hypotheses, then ask a question about it. He could have run the code and said, "Based on what I saw, I think this is going on, am I right?" This seems more likely a thought experiment (because launching two threads with one Runnable makes no sense) - putting a little thought and effort into it is a great way to learn. Nobody learns (well) by being told the answer. –  Paul Dec 17 '11 at 2:23
    
@Paul - People DO learn by having the answer explained to them in detail. If they properly read and understand the explanations, then they learn well. That's why we recommend people read text books. –  Stephen C Dec 17 '11 at 2:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

(First, please stick to the Java coding conventions. A class name should always start with a capital letter. No exceptions.)

Only one of the threads will execute the run() method at a time.

The A.run() method is an instance method, and it is declared as synchronized. These two facts mean that it will acquire a lock on this (i.e. the instance of A) before entering the method body, and release it on exiting. In short, run() locks this.

So in your main program you are creating a single A instance and passing it as the target object for two threads. They both need to execute the run() method on the same object, and this cannot happen at the same time ... by the reasoning of the previous paragraph.

This does not necessarily mean that one thread will block the other. It is also possible that the first thread to be started will have completed its run() call before the second thread is ready to try the call. But we can say ... definitively ... that the two threads' calls to run() will NOT overlap in time.

share|improve this answer

They will block each other, since they're both synchronized on the same object.

For example, this program:

public class Foo
{
    public static void main(final String... args)
    {
        final Runnable r =
            new Runnable()
            {
                public synchronized void run()
                {
                    for(int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
                    {
                        System.out.println(i);
                        try
                            { Thread.sleep(1000L); }
                        catch(final InterruptedException ie)
                            { throw new RuntimeException(ie); }
                    }
                }
            };
        new Thread(r).start();
        new Thread(r).start();
    }
}

will print 0 through 9, pausing for a second after number, and then do it again. It will not interlace the two sets of numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
But your thread is on same object "r"; in my case am making shallow copy of obj1 (obj2 = obj1) and acquiring lock on both, will it work same? –  anjali Dec 17 '11 at 2:28
    
@anjali, you aren't making a copy of an object, you're making a copy of the reference to an object. –  Mike Daniels Dec 17 '11 at 2:30
    
@MikeDaniels yeah, but does it work same? i mean acquiring lock by obj1 and obj2 is same? –  anjali Dec 17 '11 at 2:33
    
@anjali obj1 and obj2 are the same object; obj1 == obj2. The analogy is that there's a house somewhere, that's your object. You never refer to it by the physical house itself (your business card would be huge!), but by its address. You can copy the text of that address as many times as you want, but all those slips of paper still refer to the same one house. In your code, obj1 and obj2 are the slips of paper that refer to the object created by new a(). The line a obj2 = obj1 just copied the address written on obj1 to a new slip of paper called obj2 -- it didn't make a new house. –  yshavit Dec 17 '11 at 7:39
    
Sorry, ran out of room... the last piece of the puzzle is that the synchronization is against the house, not the slip of paper -- it's against the actual object, not against the reference to it. –  yshavit Dec 17 '11 at 7:45

Synchronization forces the threads to run in order (block).

Synchronization, by definition, means that a method is run "one at a time". The first thread to be executed (likely "t") will thus complete before the 2nd thread (probably "t1")'s run() method is entered.

To test the synchronization effects:

The best experiment to run will be to fill the run() method with a call to

 Thread.sleep(1000);

Then run your code with, and without the "synchronized" keyword, and time the programs execution .

share|improve this answer
    
t1 might also run before t. –  JB Nizet Dec 17 '11 at 8:49

The output of this code is getting intermixing of thread1 and thread0

package oopd;
/**
*
* @author mani deepak
*/
public class Oopd {

/**
 * @param args the command line arguments
 */
public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    // TODO code application logic here
    Deepak d,d1;
    d=new Deepak();
    d1=new Deepak();
    Thread t,t1;
    t=new Thread(d);
    t1=new Thread(d1);
    t.start();
    t1.start();
}
}

class Deepak implements Runnable
{
@Override
public synchronized void run()
{
    String s=Thread.currentThread().getName();
    for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
    {
        try
        {
        Thread.sleep(100);
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {

        }
        System.out.println(s+" "+i);
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.