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I'm trying to read the first line of an MP3 file (I edited this mp3 file to contain the text "I'm an MP3" right at the beginning of the file).

This is what I'm trying to do:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    fstream mp3;
    mp3.open("05 Imagine.mp3", ios::binary | ios::in | ios::out);
    /*mp3.seekg(0, ios::end);
    int lof = mp3.tellg();
    cout << "Length of file: " << lof << endl;
    mp3.seekg(0, ios::beg);*/

    //char ch;
    //cout << mp3.get(ch) << endl;

    char* somebuf;
    while(mp3.read(somebuf, 10)) //Read the first 10 chars which are "I'm an MP3 file".
    {
        //cout << somebuf;
    }
    return 0;
}

For some reason, that is crashing. At some point it didn't crash, but it didn't print anything when I did cout << somebuf. Can someone help me with this?

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The first ten characters would be "I'm an MP3" –  Corbin Dec 17 '11 at 4:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You never allocated anything for somebuf:

char* somebuf;

therefore, it doesn't point anywhere.

char* somebuf = new char[11];
somebuf[10] = '\0';          //  Not sure if it is necessary to null-terminate...
while(mp3.read(somebuf, 10)) //  Read the first 10 chars which are "I'm an MP3 file".
{
    //cout << somebuf;
}


//  and free it later
delete [] somebuf;

Alternatively:

char somebuf[11];
somebuf[10] = '\0';          //  Not sure if it is necessary to null-terminate...
while(mp3.read(somebuf, 10)) //  Read the first 10 chars which are "I'm an MP3 file".
{
    //cout << somebuf;
}
share|improve this answer
    
why do you need 11? –  Kashyap Dec 17 '11 at 4:14
    
And don't forget to delete[] it afterwards :) Alternatively, you could use a cstring: char somebuf[10] = {};. I added the = {} to initialise the string elements to null characters, which isn't required here but it's good practice in general. –  Chris Parton Dec 17 '11 at 4:14
    
@thekashyap He wants to print it out. I'm not sure if it needs to be null-terminated. –  Mysticial Dec 17 '11 at 4:15
    
Ah, I see you beat me to it :P @thekashyap: You need 11 characters so that you can insert a "null character" at the end of the string. If your string does not have a null character, you won't be able to output it or use functions such as strcpy, strlen etc as they cannot determine where the string ends if it doesn't have a null character to terminate it. –  Chris Parton Dec 17 '11 at 4:16
    
after you added somebuf[10] = '\0'; it makes sense.. :) –  Kashyap Dec 17 '11 at 4:17

Initialize the buffer:

char somebuf[10];
    while(mp3.read(somebuf, 10)) //Read the first 10 chars which are "I'm an MP3 file".
    {
        //cout << somebuf;
    }
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