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Is there a container adapter that would reverse the direction of iterators so I can iterate over a container in reverse with range-based for-loop?

With explicit iterators I would convert this:

for (auto i = c.begin(); i != c.end(); ++i) { ...

into this:

for (auto i = c.rbegin(); i != c.rend(); ++i) { ...

I want to convert this:

for (auto& i: c) { ...

to this:

for (auto& i: std::magic_reverse_adapter(c)) { ...

Is there such a thing or do I have to write it myself?

share|improve this question
9  
A reverse container adapter, sounds interesting, but I think you'll have to write it yourself. We wouldn't have this problem if the Standard committee would hurry up and adapt range based algorithms instead of explicit iterators. –  deft_code Dec 17 '11 at 4:34
1  
@SethCarnegie, 600 characters huh. Let's see it. –  deft_code Dec 17 '11 at 4:36
4  
@deft_code: "instead of?" Why would you want to get rid of iterator based algorithms? They're much better and less verbose for cases where you don't iterate from begin to end, or for dealing with stream iterators and the like. Range algorithms would be great, but they're really just syntactic sugar (except for the possibility of lazy evaluation) over iterator algorithms. –  Nicol Bolas Dec 17 '11 at 4:41
12  
@deft_code template<typename T> class reverse_adapter { public: reverse_adapter(T& c) : c(c) { } typename T::reverse_iterator begin() { return c.rbegin(); } typename T::reverse_iterator end() { return c.rend(); } private: T& c; }; It can be improved (adding const versions, etc) but it works: vector<int> v {1, 2, 3}; reverse_adapter<decltype(v)> ra; for (auto& i : ra) cout << i; prints 321 –  Seth Carnegie Dec 17 '11 at 4:56
7  
@SethCarnegie: And to add a nice functional form: template<typename T> reverse_adapter<T> reverse_adapt_container(T &c) {return reverse_adapter<T>(c);} So then you can just use for(auto &i: reverse_adapt_container(v)) cout << i; to iterate. –  Nicol Bolas Dec 17 '11 at 5:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 98 down vote accepted

Actually Boost does have such adaptor: boost::adaptors::reverse.

#include <list>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/range/adaptor/reversed.hpp>

int main()
{
    std::list<int> x { 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19 };
    for (auto i : boost::adaptors::reverse(x))
        std::cout << i << '\n';
    for (auto i : x)
        std::cout << i << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well I thought you were the guy who thought there is no solution (the history doesn't show). Regardless, I still think you could have edited my solution. They are very similar! –  Arlen Dec 17 '11 at 23:42
7  
@Arlen: I think "bear a vague resemblance" is a better characterisation than "are very similar". –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 14 '12 at 0:58
7  
This is a better include-file: #include <boost/range/adaptor/reversed.hpp> When I include the one given in the answer, the VC++ linker complains about a missing regex library. –  Jive Dadson Sep 29 '12 at 20:48

This should work in C++11 without boost:

namespace std {
template<class T>
T begin(std::pair<T, T> p)
{
    return p.first;
}
template<class T>
T end(std::pair<T, T> p)
{
    return p.second;
}
}

template<class Iterator>
std::reverse_iterator<Iterator> make_reverse_iterator(Iterator it)
{
    return std::reverse_iterator<Iterator>(it);
}

template<class Range>
std::pair<std::reverse_iterator<decltype(begin(std::declval<Range>()))>, std::reverse_iterator<decltype(begin(std::declval<Range>()))>> make_reverse_range(Range&& r)
{
    return std::make_pair(make_reverse_iterator(begin(r)), make_reverse_iterator(end(r)));
}

for(auto x: make_reverse_range(r))
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
21  
IIRC adding anything to namespace std is an invitation to epic fail. –  BCS Sep 18 '13 at 1:33
5  
I'm not sure about the normative meaning of "epic fail", but overloading a function in the std namespace has undefined behavior per 17.6.4.2.1. –  Casey Mar 6 at 15:34
1  
It's in C++14 apparently, under this name. –  HostileFork Dec 14 at 23:42

Does this work for you:

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <boost/range/begin.hpp>
#include <boost/range/end.hpp>
#include <boost/range/iterator_range.hpp>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){

  typedef std::list<int> Nums;
  typedef Nums::iterator NumIt;
  typedef boost::range_reverse_iterator<Nums>::type RevNumIt;
  typedef boost::iterator_range<NumIt> irange_1;
  typedef boost::iterator_range<RevNumIt> irange_2;

  Nums n = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
  irange_1 r1 = boost::make_iterator_range( boost::begin(n), boost::end(n) );
  irange_2 r2 = boost::make_iterator_range( boost::end(n), boost::begin(n) );


  // prints: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
  for(auto e : r1)
    std::cout << e << ' ';

  std::cout << std::endl;

  // prints: 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
  for(auto e : r2)
    std::cout << e << ' ';

  std::cout << std::endl;

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

I did not know about the boost version. I had already written an adapter that works, when I came across this Q&A. I was searching around Stackoverflow to see if I could figure out why the MS compiler is not happy unless I use trailing return types for begin() and end(). Here is the code that works:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

template<class Fwd>
struct Reverser {
    const Fwd &fwd;
    Reverser<Fwd>(const Fwd &fwd_): fwd(fwd_) {}
    auto begin() -> decltype(fwd.rbegin()) const { return fwd.rbegin(); } 
    auto end() -> decltype(fwd.rend()) const  { return fwd.rend(); } 
};

template<class Fwd>
Reverser<Fwd> reverse(const Fwd &fwd) { return Reverser<Fwd>(fwd); }

int main() {
    using namespace std;
    string str = ".dlrow olleH";
    for(char c: reverse(str)) cout << c;
    cout << endl;
}

UPDATE: Here's a better one.

template<class Fwd>
struct Reverser_generic {
    Fwd &fwd;
    Reverser_generic(Fwd& fwd_): fwd(fwd_) {}
    typedef std::reverse_iterator<typename Fwd::iterator> reverse_iterator;
    reverse_iterator begin() { return reverse_iterator(std::end(fwd)); } 
    reverse_iterator end() { return reverse_iterator(std::begin(fwd)); } 
};

template<class Fwd >
struct Reverser_special{
    Fwd &fwd;
    Reverser_special(Fwd& fwd_): fwd(fwd_) {}
    auto begin() -> decltype(fwd.rbegin()){ return fwd.rbegin(); } 
    auto end() ->decltype(fwd.rbegin())   { return fwd.rend(); } 
};

template<class Fwd>
auto reverse_impl(Fwd& fwd, long) -> decltype( Reverser_generic<Fwd>(fwd)){ 
    return Reverser_generic<Fwd>(fwd);
}

template<class Fwd>
auto reverse_impl(Fwd& fwd, int) 
    -> decltype(fwd.rbegin(), Reverser_special<Fwd>(fwd))
{ 
    return Reverser_special<Fwd>(fwd);
}

template<class Fwd>
auto reverse( Fwd&& fwd) -> decltype(reverse_impl(fwd,int(0))) {
    static_assert(!(is_rvalue_reference<Fwd&&>::value), 
        "Cannot pass rvalue_reference to dj::reverse()");
    return reverse_impl(fwd,int(0));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that your code will invoke UB if you pass Reverser<>'s constructor a temporary. –  ildjarn Oct 4 '12 at 22:23
2  
@ildjam The object returned by reverse() is good (only) for the lifetime of the object fwd. That's true of the boost version too. Iterators and reverse-iterators on expired objects are never any good. –  Jive Dadson Oct 5 '12 at 4:08
    
My point was less that it's a problem, and more that it's an easily avoidable problem. Add a deleted constructor for Fwd const && and the problem is no more. ;-] –  ildjarn Oct 5 '12 at 4:35
    
@ildjam Show me. Remember, the call to the contructor comes from one of the reverse_impl functions, which was called by reverse. Show me how to disallow passing in a temporary without breaking something. It must allow all operations on non-const objects, allow read-access to const objects, and reject at compile time attempts to write to const objects. By the way, VC++ 2012 does not have =delete. But I do not think it would help. Like I said, show me. Always happy to learn a new trick. BTW again, boost reverse has the same issue, and those boost guys are good. –  Jive Dadson Oct 5 '12 at 19:48
2  
Here is an implementation using proper perfect forwarding without static_assert, and here is an implementation with static_assert. As you can see, the static_assert makes the errors much more intelligible. –  ildjarn Oct 6 '12 at 21:41

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