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I've confused myself nicely here. My scenario is as follows.

function DesignPad() {  
 function EditBar() {  
  ...  
  this.removeHandler = function() {  
    **// how do I call Dragger.removeAsset**  
  }  
 }  
 function Dragger(){  
  ...  
  this.removeAsset = function() {}  
 }  
 this.init = function() {  
  this.editBar = new EditBar();  
  this.dragger = new Dragger();  
 }  
}  

var dp = new DesignPad();  
...

I can't seem to call Dragger.RemoveAsset. I understand the why, my question is how do I call it?

I'm trying to keep like-things separated (eg Dragger / EditBar) but I seem to get all sorts of mixed up in my event handlers. Any suggestions, good reading materials, etc on this stuff?

Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I found Douglas Crockford's Javascript to be the best introduction to JavaScript. Especialy videos for Yahoo, like: The JavaScript Programming Language where you can learn how exactly are objects created and inherited in JS.

Solution to you problem is:

function DesignPad() {  
  var that = this;
 function EditBar() {  
  this.removeHandler = function() {  
    print("RemoveHandler");
    that.dragger.removeAsset();
  }  
 }  
 function Dragger() {  
  this.removeAsset = function() {
    print("RemoveAsset");
  }  
 }  
 this.init = function() {  
  this.editBar = new EditBar();  
  this.dragger = new Dragger();  
 }
}  

var dp = new DesignPad();
dp.init();
dp.editBar.removeHandler();

But as others noticed you could refactor some things :).

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beaten by 6 minutes, and by a nicer solution :) Note that you meant alert (not print). –  MickTaiwan May 12 '09 at 19:41
1  
That's brilliant solution by the way. Just to give some clarification, when you enter EditBar function a closure is created. Closure remembers what happens around, therefore it also remembers "that" variable. Even if you take the function and assign it to some external event, the closure will still be there. –  Michał Rudnicki May 12 '09 at 19:45
    
That was it. Thanks! Definitely gonna take a closer look at Crockford's site as well. Thanks again. –  frio80 May 12 '09 at 19:47
    
@Michał it is neat solution I've learnt from Crockford - he's the brilliant JavaScripter :) @MichTaiwan the print is because I tested it using Rhino :) –  rkj May 13 '09 at 7:20

To me it just looks like you should refactor that code to make it simpler.

I think that your issue comes from the fact that a nested function is private, so you can't access it from outside.

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Is an instance of Dragger a 'property' of your DesignPad object? If so, you could pass a reference to that object into your removeHandler() method.

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Try this:

function DesignPad() {  

 function EditBar(s) {  
  super = s;
  this.removeHandler = function() {
    alert('call 1'); 
    super.dragger.removeAsset();  
  }  
 } 


 function Dragger(s){
  super = s;  
  this.removeAsset = function() {
      alert('call 2'); 
    }  
 }  

 this.init = function() {  
  this.editBar = new EditBar(this);  
  this.dragger = new Dragger(this);  
 }  

}  

var dp = new DesignPad(); 
dp.init()
dp.editBar.removeHandler();
alert('end');
share|improve this answer
    
I think you should use "var super = " instead of just "super = " :) –  rkj May 13 '09 at 7:22

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