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I see this used a lot:

$("img").hide( 800, function() {
    $(this).show();
});

...but can we get the same affect like this:

$("img").hide( 800, "$(this).show();" );

I see this used a lot:

$(this).hide();

...but can we get the same affect like this:

this.hide();

...how about this:

$("this").hide();

I see this used a lot:

element.click(function() {
    notify();
});

...but can we get the same affect like this:

element.click(notify);

My point:

Are there simpler versions of the common jQuery methods we normally use?

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List some common methods. –  Blender Dec 17 '11 at 5:21
1  
As long as it has the same functionality, it's fine. But, for example, $("selector").action( speed, "$(this).action();" ); depends on eval which would impede the speed of this. (In fact, eval should typically be avoided, though in a case like this, the negative effects are fairly minimal.) Just because it does the same thing does not always mean it does the same thing in the same way. Also $(this) just ensures that the this is a jQuery object. Usually unnecessary, but worth 3 key strokes. –  Corbin Dec 17 '11 at 5:23
    
I'm answering to clear up some of your confusion and voting to close because your question is full of misconceptions. –  mu is too short Dec 17 '11 at 5:52
    
I'm voting to close because you can just as easily test that crap out or read the documentation. –  vol7ron Dec 17 '11 at 6:50
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3 Answers

...but can we get the same affect like this:

$("img").hide( 800, "$(this).show();" );

Um, no you can't. If the second argument to hide is a string then it should be an easing and "$(this).show();" is not an easing; so $("img").hide( 800, "$(this).show();" ); will just put incomprehensible errors into your console and won't even hide anything.

If you're seeing this:

$(this).hide;

used a lot then you're looking at a lot of useless code and you should start looking at better code. $(this).hide; doesn't do anything useful, perhaps it will exercise your JavaScript engine's dead code removal algorithms but it certainly won't hide anything on the page. Saying $(this).hide; is no more productive than saying 42;; sure, they're both legal statements but they don't do anything useful.

Perhaps you meant:

$(this).hide();

But that is totally different than this.hide(); unless this is already a jQuery object. Standard DOM objects do not have hide methods so this.hide(); is, in general, an error whereas $(this).hide(); hides a DOM object and moves on to the next statement.

And finally, we get to something that at least makes sense:

element.click(function() {
    notify();
});
// [...]
element.click(notify);

The click function just needs a callback function so you can give it a function name or anonymous function (i.e. a function "literal"). Similarly, you can say pancakes(11); or var eggs = 11; pancakes(11);.

So yes, you can use a named function as a jQuery callback; but, those two element.click calls are not equivalent. In the first case:

element.click(function() { notify() });

The value of this inside notify will be window; in the second case:

element.click(notify)

this will be element's DOM object inside notify.

Maybe this isn't much of an answer but I needed more space than a comment offers to point out all the confusion in your question.

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Thanks! I edited my question. By $(this).hide; I meant $(this).hide(); –  Web_Designer Dec 17 '11 at 6:48
    
@Web_Designer: That's what I thought so I addressed that case along with the rest. –  mu is too short Dec 17 '11 at 6:52
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$(this).hide; Won't actually do anything, I assume you mean $(this).hide() ?

this.hide(); You need a deeper understanding of how jQuery works, and how the DOM works. $(this) in most situations wraps the value of this , a native DOM element into a jQuery object. Normal DOM Elements don't have a hide method.

For example, you couldn't do document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].hide() because the DOM body element does not have a hide method. jQuery wraps the element into a jQuery object, which is essentially an array with lots of cool methods, like hide()

$("this").hide; And finally I think you need a deeper understanding of how Javascript works. The this keyword is special, and not related to the string "this".

This is a vague question based on misunderstood principles, and I think a very good example of why you should focus on learning Javascript, not jQuery.

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Well, actually, these two are different:

element.click(notify);

element.click(function() {
    notify();
});

The first one will execute function notify upon going through that line (check with debugger). It will also do the obvious - attach a click event. The second one does not call notify upon attaching that function to the click event.

As for the other differences - they are not so much jQuery differences, but Javascript syntax differences. There's quite a bit of inconsistencies here are there - a lot of it coming from browser support and how they actually implement the official ECMAscript, DOM and other extensions.

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3  
You're saying that the statement "element.click(notify);" will execute notify()? If that is what you're saying, that is wrong (unless click calls notify). –  Corbin Dec 17 '11 at 5:30
    
I second @Corbin see demo: jsfiddle.net/Daniel_Hug/qj8kG/1 –  Web_Designer Dec 17 '11 at 5:33
    
Yes, that is what I meant. Are you positive about this? I've always been thinking this was a default behavior, as I have had problems with that in the past. –  mateusz Dec 17 '11 at 5:43
    
@mateusz, only if you include the open+close parentheses, like element.click(notify()) will it execute the function. without the parens its just a reference to a function –  nathan gonzalez Dec 17 '11 at 5:48
    
Stop stop stop stop. Why is this even a discussion? Use the jQuery docs, not guesswork api.jquery.com/click . This answer is also completely wrong. The function is not executed on binding. And most importantly, which you will know from reading the docs, is that the second example eats the click event object passed in to notify. –  Andy Ray Dec 17 '11 at 5:51
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