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I have methods that look like this:

public IDictionary<string, string> Delete(Account account)
{
    try { _accountRepository.Delete(account); }
    catch { _errors.Add("", "Error when deleting account"); }
    return _errors;
}

public IDictionary<string, string> ValidateNoDuplicate(Account ac)
{
    var accounts = GetAccounts(ac.PartitionKey);
    if (accounts.Any(b => b.Title.Equals(ac.Title) &&
                            !b.RowKey.Equals(ac.RowKey)))
        _errors.Add("Account.Title", "Duplicate");
    return _errors;
}

I would like to change this method so that it returns a bool and so it throws an exception if there is an error instead of:

_errors.Add("", "Error when deleting account");

Can someone explain to me how I can throw an exception and pass a message containing a key and a value. In this case the key would be "" and the value would be "Error when deleting account".

Also in the method that calls this. How would I catch the exception?

Would it be necessary for me to make my own class and somehow throw an exception based on this class?

share|improve this question
    
What is the type of _errors? –  M.Babcock Dec 17 '11 at 7:13
    
private Dictionary<string, string> _errors; –  Samantha J Dec 17 '11 at 7:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Create your own exception class, that can hold the data that you need:

public class AccountException : ApplicationException {

  public Dictionary<string, string> Errors { get; set; };

  public AccountException(Exception ex) : base(ex) {
    Errors = new Dictionary<string, string>();
  }

  public AccountException() : this(null) {}

}

In your methods you can throw the exception. Don't return an error status also, that is handled by the exception.

Don't throw away the exception that you get in the method, include that as InnerException, so that it can be used for debugging.

public void Delete(Account account) {
  try {
    _accountRepository.Delete(account);
  } catch(Exception ex) {
    AccountException a = new AccountException(ex);
    a.Errors.Add("", "Error when deleting account");
    throw a;
  }
}

public void ValidateNoDuplicate(Account ac) {
  var accounts = GetAccounts(ac.PartitionKey);
  if (accounts.Any(b => b.Title.Equals(ac.Title) &&
                            !b.RowKey.Equals(ac.RowKey))) {
    AccountException a = new AccountException();
    a.Errors.Add("Account.Title", "Duplicate");
    throw a;
  }
}

When calling the methods, you catch your exception type:

try {
  Delete(account);
} catch(AccountException ex) {
  // Handle the exception here.
  // The ex.Errors property contains the string pairs.
  // The ex.InnerException contains the actual exception
}
share|improve this answer

The Exception class has a Data property that is a dictionary of key/value pairs.

IDictionary<string, string> errors;
...

if (errors.Count > 0)
{
    Exception ex = ... construct exception of the appropriate type
    foreach(string key in _errors.Keys)
    {
        ex.Data.Add(key, _errors[key]);
    }
    throw ex;
}

Note that it's generally considered to be good practice to use Exceptions that are Serializable, so that the objects you put into the Data dictionary should also be serializable. In your example, you're just putting in strings, so you'll be fine.

Would it be necessary for me to make my own class and somehow throw an exception based on this class?

It's certainly not necessary to create your own custom Exception class, and may not be desirable. The MSDN design guidelines for Exceptions gives guidelines on choosing which Exception type to throw.

In general, you should prefer to use one of the existing Exception types unless you have an error condition that can be programatically handled in a different way from existing Exception types.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I will look more into this. Right now I'm not sure how I can use it. –  Samantha J Dec 17 '11 at 7:43
    
See my update answer. –  Charandeep Singh Dec 17 '11 at 7:44

Create your own Exception and then throwing it.

public class RepositoryException : Exception
{
    public RepositoryException() : base()
    {
    }

    public RepositoryException(string key, string value) : base()
    {
        base.Data.Add(key, value);
    }

    public RepositoryException(string message) : base(message)
    {
    }

    public RepositoryException(string message, Exception innerException) : base(message, innerException)
    {
    }
}


public Boolean Delete(Account account)
{
    try 
    { 
        _accountRepository.Delete(account); 
        return true;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    { 
        throw new RepositoryException("", "Error when deleting account");            
        // throw new RepositoryException("Error when deleting account", ex);
        // OR just
        // throw new RepositoryException("Error when deleting account");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But my problem is I need to throw an exception with two strings. A key and a value. For example how could I throw the exception using your method when I need to pass the information "Account.Title" as a key and "Duplicate" as a value? I think what I need to do is to create my own type of exception using a class but I am not sure how to do that. –  Samantha J Dec 17 '11 at 7:29
    
I have updated answer accordingly. –  Charandeep Singh Dec 17 '11 at 7:41
    
Thanks Charandeep. Where do you use the ServiceException? I see it's created but not used. Also how can I get the data from the exception in my outer method? –  Samantha J Dec 17 '11 at 7:52
    
Oops, my bad it is actually one of constructor overload. I have edited it. –  Charandeep Singh Dec 17 '11 at 8:01

You could throw your own exceptions instead of

_errors.Add("", "Error when deleting account");

So every _errors.Add(..) will be replaced with something like

throw new MyAppException(key, value);

How to create your own exception class was explained above. So you supply your exception object with key and value.

You should know which exception type you're going to catch

try {
  Delete(account);
} catch(NullPointerException ex) {
  throw new MyAppException(key, value);
}

And now in your caller-methods(outer-methods) you can catch only your exceptions.

try {
  _accountRepository.Delete(account);
} catch(MyAppException ex) {
  //exception handle logic
}
share|improve this answer

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