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I have the following example array:

$comparisons = array(
    0 => array(
        'method'    => 'productTotalQuantity',
        'operator'  => '>=',
        'value'     => '2'
    ),
    1 => array(
        'method'    => 'productTotalWeight',
        'operator'  => '<=',
        'value'     => '10'
    )
);

I have invented this array structure, so it can be altered if required. I am trying to somehow evaluate the operator key, so that I can achieve something along the lines of:

foreach ($comparisons as $comparison) {
    $value = $this->$comparison['method']($product);
    // E.g. $value = $this->productTotalQuantity($product)
    // $value could = 4

    if ($value $comparison['operator'] $comparison['value']) {
        // Comparison successful
        $matches[] = TRUE;
    }
}

if (count($matches) == count($comparisons)) {
    // All comparisons were successful. Apply the discount.
}

If you have time, a full code example of how to parse this array would be extremely helpful. I've been working on it for about 20 hours straight and think I'm about to literally bash my head against a brick wall. If you are familiar with Magento, I am trying to somewhat mimic the functionality of the "Shopping Cart Price Rule" Conditions in Promotions.

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Hint: There will not only be one "value" to compare to, e.g. for "between" where you have start and end values. So do a switch where you e.g. check for "GT" (greater than) or "EG" (equal or greater) and here "between" and then call a validator function with all necessary arguments ( is_between($unit, $start, $end); ) ... Also think about that you could have more than one test per unit, like say not_empty => is_int() => is_between(2,20) –  djot Dec 17 '11 at 8:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

"translating" operations from strings to real operations is mostly dirty and or evil :-) you need a lot of conditional code (if-else) or eval (but everybody knows: eval is evil ^^)

I would use an object-oriented approach, since PHP does support object orientation (I don't know the exact php syntax, it has been a while ;-)) and I give you pseudo code to enforce the ideas:

class AbstractComparator {
   boolean static compare($operand1, $operand2);   
}

class EqualsComparator extends AbstractComparator {
   @Override
   boolean static compare($operand1, $operand2) {
      return ($operand1 == $operand2);
   }
}

// Now use one of the subclasses in your datastructure
$comparisons = array(
0 => array(
    'method'    => 'productTotalQuantity',
    'operator'  => EqualsComparator,
    'value'     => '2'
),
1 => array(
    'method'    => 'productTotalWeight',
    'operator'  => SmallerThanComparator,
    'value'     => '10'
)
);

$allComparisonsSuccessful = true;
foreach ($comparisons as $comparison) {
   $value = $comparison['operator'].equals($product);
    // Use the AND operator... full predicate is only true if all elements are true
   $allComparisonsSuccessful = $allComparisonsSuccessful && $value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is interesting! I'm unsure of exactly how this will work with unserialize, as the array will come from a serialized string. But I will investigate! –  Azriel Dec 17 '11 at 8:49
    
You'll have to look for "php reflection"... maybe you should store the classname in your array and after that use something like getClassForName($comparison['operator']).equals() –  strauberry Dec 17 '11 at 9:00
    
Yeah that's the conclusion I came to as well, to store the class name as a string :) and then possibly to use a Factory class to make them. –  Azriel Dec 17 '11 at 9:22
    
Ok cool! So you are very flexible and have a good design... –  strauberry Dec 17 '11 at 9:45
    
Actually you were right, didn't need a factory for this. Just calling them statically as you suggested is the best way. –  Azriel Dec 18 '11 at 19:08

This would be an easy job for eval(). Unfortunately, there's an important rule about when to use eval() which is: Never do it.

So instead you could introduce a method like this

function parseComparison($comparison)
{
    list($methodValue,$operator,$value);
    switch ($operator)
    {
        case '>=': return $methodValue >= $value;
        case '<=': return $methodValue <= $value;
        case '>':  return $methodValue >  $value;
        case '<':  return $methodValue <  $value;
        default: return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
<?php

$ge = function($a, $b) {return($a >= $b);};
$le = function($a, $b) {return($a <= $b);};

$comparisons = array(
    array(
        'method'    => 'productTotalQuantity',
        'operator'  => $ge,
        'value'     => 2
    ),
    array(
        'method'    => 'productTotalWeight',
        'operator'  => $le,
        'value'     => 10
    )
);

// finds out if discount should be applied in this price range
function discount_finder($myval, $comparisons) {
    $discount = TRUE;
    foreach($comparisons as $comp) {
        if (!$comp['operator']($myval, $comp['value'])) {
            $discount = FALSE;
            $break;
        }
    }
    return $discount;
}

$discount = discount_finder(1, $comparisons);
if ($discount == TRUE) {  // apply discount
    echo "Discount applied!!!\n";
} else {
    echo "no discount!\n";
}

$discount = discount_finder(6, $comparisons);
if ($discount == TRUE) {  // apply discount
    echo "Discount applied!!!\n";
} else {
    echo "no discount!\n";
}

$discount = discount_finder(13, $comparisons);
if ($discount == TRUE) {  // apply discount
    echo "Discount applied!!!\n";
} else {
    echo "no discount!\n";
}

?>
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