Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I have this code:

var parent = links[i].parentNode;

I'd like to write something like:

if (parent.typeOfElement == "div") {
 ...
}

How can I do that?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, Quentin, stecb, Anne, brasofilo Oct 15 '13 at 4:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Btw, what you want is not the type of a node, but the name. –  Felix Kling Dec 17 '11 at 11:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use .tagName, which is (for elements) the same as .nodeName.

So:

if (parent.tagName === "DIV") {
   //
}

Note that the tag name is supposed to be returned in uppercase for HTML, but in XML (including xhtml) it is supposed to preserve the original case - which for xhtml means it should be lowercase. To be safe, and allow for any future changes to your document type and allow for non-standard browser behaviour you might want to convert to all upper or all lower:

if (parent.tagName.toUpperCase() === "DIV") {
   //
}

In my experience .tagName is used much more often, but I gather that some consider .nodeName a better choice because it works for attributes (and more) as well as elements.

share|improve this answer
if (parent.nodeName == "div") {
    ...
 }

See: http://www.javascriptkit.com/domref/elementproperties.shtml

share|improve this answer
2  
For element nodes in an HTML document, nodeName is effectively an alias for tagName. While HTML tag names aren't case sensitive, it is common (though possibly not universal) for browsers to return tag names in upper case as suggested in the DOM Core standard. To ensure consistency, use .toLowerCase or toUpperCase to ensure the tagName has a particular case. –  RobG Dec 17 '11 at 11:51
    
I tried it but alerts nothing, though there are div parents of a. –  xralf Dec 17 '11 at 12:01

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.