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Is it possible to add a base class to an object instance (not a class!) at runtime? Something along the lines of how Object#extend works in Ruby:

class Gentleman(object):
  def introduce_self(self):
    return "Hello, my name is %s" % self.name

class Person(object):
  def __init__(self, name):
    self.name = name

p = Person("John")
# how to implement this method?
extend(p, Gentleman)
p.introduce_self() # => "Hello, my name is John"
share|improve this question
    
Why downvote this without a comment? Maybe because the word Ruby appears in the text? oO –  Niklas B. Dec 17 '11 at 13:35
1  
Uuuuurrgghhh!!!!! Changing an instance without changing the class is a recipe for disaster. The nicer way to do this is to make a subclass of Person and mix Gentleman into that. –  katrielalex Dec 17 '11 at 14:01
    
@katrielalex: Probably you're right in most cases. Nevertheless, I need that functionality because I want to add functionality to a third-party library whose interface I cannot change. I had to choose between mixins or the proxy pattern, of which the latter I don't like very much. –  Niklas B. Dec 17 '11 at 14:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

This dynamically defines a new class GentlePerson, and reassigns p's class to it:

class Gentleman(object):
  def introduce_self(self):
    return "Hello, my name is %s" % self.name

class Person(object):
  def __init__(self, name):
    self.name = name

p = Person("John")
p.__class__ = type('GentlePerson',(Person,Gentleman),{})
print(p.introduce_self())
# "Hello, my name is John"

Per your request, this modifies p's bases, but does not alter p's original class Person. Thus, other instances of Person are unaffected (and would raise an AttributeError if introduce_self were called).


Although it was not directly asked in the question, I'll add for googlers and curiosity seekers, that it is also possible to dynamically change a class's bases but (AFAIK) only if the class does not inherit directly from object:

class Gentleman(object):
  def introduce_self(self):
    return "Hello, my name is %s" % self.name

class Base(object):pass
class Person(Base):
  def __init__(self, name):
    self.name = name

p = Person("John")
Person.__bases__=(Gentleman,object,)
print(p.introduce_self())
# "Hello, my name is John"

q = Person("Pete")
print(q.introduce_self())
# Hello, my name is Pete
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice. I actually tried to assign to __class__ but this seems to work with dynamically created classes only. This is the solution I was hoping for, thanks. –  Niklas B. Dec 17 '11 at 13:50
    
Nice! Directly from object is the key iirc; the standard workaround is to define class object(object): pass. –  katrielalex Dec 17 '11 at 14:00
    
I stumbled it a bit as I wanted the Gentleman class override a property of the Person class. For that case I switched the order to type('GentlePerson',(Gentleman,Person),{}). Hope that doesn't bring any evil. –  neo Sep 24 at 14:30
1  
@neo: That's fine. Gentleman is not a subclass of Person, nor vice versa, so either one can come first in the list of bases. –  unutbu Sep 24 at 16:56

Although it's already answered, here is a function:

def extend(instance, new_class):
    instance.__class__ = type(
                '%s_extended_with_%s' % (instance.__class__.__name__, new_class.__name__), 
                (instance.__class__, new_class), 
                {}
            )
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this pretty much the same function that I ended up with. –  Niklas B. Dec 17 '11 at 14:27
    
It is good to have a working solution but please remember this use of black magic should be well pondered, as it may be the path to the hell of hard-to-understand and hard-to-debug code. –  gb. Dec 19 '11 at 3:02

You can also alter the __bases__ attribute:

def extend(instance, cls):
    instance.__class__.__bases__ = (cls,) + instance.__class__.__bases__
share|improve this answer
3  
Yeah, but this alters the whole class, not only the instance. –  Niklas B. Dec 17 '11 at 21:58

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