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I am finding it very confusing to understand the concept of recursion. I am trying to trace a recursive function. Can someone please help me with that?

    public static int h(int n){
        if (n == 0)
            return 0;
        else
            return h(n-1)+1;
    }

When I write

int a = h(5);
System.out.println(a)

I dont understand how the result produced is actually coming?

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1  
what do you mean by 'tracing'? if you put System.out.println("h("+n+")"); before if (n==0), what would you expect as the output for h(5)? –  milan Dec 17 '11 at 14:24
    
Its a simple recursive method as you say. What exactly is the source of your confusion here? Mention it specifically. –  Lion Dec 17 '11 at 14:26
    
What exactly are you trying to trace? This satisfies all 3 conditions of a recursive function. –  tarheel Dec 17 '11 at 14:31
    
If it's just about the basic concepts of recursion, you may want to start from here. –  home Dec 17 '11 at 14:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First of all, if you have difficulty in understanding the concept of recursion, I think the following links will help you:

You may use the debugging facility on your IDE to see how it is working. You may Google for instructions on how to set beakpoints and use the debugger to step through the program.

About the method h, It will return what you given as input(if it is a positive number or 0). Also large numbers & negative numbers will cause a StackOverflowError. To know the working you may use a print statement inside your method.

public static int h(int n) {
    System.out.println("h(" + n + ")");
    if (n == 0) {
        System.out.println("value: 0");
        return 0;
    } else {
        System.out.println("going down");
        int temp = h(n - 1) + 1;
        System.out.println("h(" + n + ") --> " + temp);
        return temp;
    }
}

will output:

h(5)
going down
h(4)
going down
h(3)
going down
h(2)
going down
h(1)
going down
h(0)
value: 0
h(1) --> 1
h(2) --> 2
h(3) --> 3
h(4) --> 4
h(5) --> 5

The above output can be edited to show the working:

h(5)
|    going down
|----h(4)
|    |   going down
|    |---h(3)
|    |   |   going down
|    |   |---h(2)
|    |   |   |  going down
|    |   |   |--h(1)
|    |   |   |  |    going down
|    |   |   |  |----h(0)
|    |   |   |  |    |    value: 0 --> return 0;
|    |   |   |  |    h(1) --> 1 --> h(0) + 1 = 0 + 1 = 1
|    |   |   |  h(2) --> 2          h(1) + 1 = 1 + 1 = 2
|    |   |   h(3) --> 3             h(2) + 2 = 1 + 1 = 3
|    |   h(4) --> 4                 h(3) + 3 = 1 + 1 = 4
|    h(5) --> 5                     h(4) + 4 = 1 + 1 = 5

The following is the non-recursive version of the method h.

public static int nonh(int n) {
    int result = 0;
    for (int i = n; i > 0; i--) {
        result += 1;
    }

    return result;
}

Hope that helps :)

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could you suggest me the non recursive version of the method. May be that will help me understand it better. I understood until value:0, then how did the other lines print? –  Subash Dec 17 '11 at 14:52
1  
@subash Edited the answer to show more details. –  Jomoos Dec 17 '11 at 15:05

To trace this recursive call in a debugger, set break point on the if statement, and run your program. When the breakpoint is reached:

  • Inspect the value of n,
  • Look at the call stack window.

The number of items on the call stack would grow with each recursive invocation; the value of n would go down by one. When you are several levels deep into the call, click different items on the call stack. It would bring you to the call site (i.e. return h(n-1)+1). You will be able to inspect the value of n at this level of the stack.

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that makes it a lot clear. but when I do int a = h(5); System.out.println(a) why does it return 5? –  Subash Dec 17 '11 at 14:45
    
That's because your recursive method returns the value passed to it: h(0) returns 0, h(1) returns 0+1, h(2) returns 0+1+1, and so on. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 17 '11 at 14:54
    
Thanks now I got it.. –  Subash Dec 17 '11 at 14:58

Try logging. Or, well, just debug-printing:

public static int h(int n){
    System.out.println("called h(" + n + ")");
    if (n == 0) {
        System.out.println("we know the result for 0, returning 0");
        return 0;
    } else {
        System.out.println("we don't know the result, calling for " + (n-1));
        int t = h(n-1);
        System.out.println("Found the result for " + (n-1) + 
                           ", calculating the result for " + n);
        return t + 1;
    }
}

For n = 4, you'll get:

called h(4)
we don't know the result, calling for 3
called h(3)
we don't know the result, calling for 2
called h(2)
we don't know the result, calling for 1
called h(1)
we don't know the result, calling for 0
called h(0)
we know the result for 0, returning 0
Found the result for 0, calculating the result for 1
Found the result for 1, calculating the result for 2
Found the result for 2, calculating the result for 3
Found the result for 3, calculating the result for 4

Hope it'll give you a clue — play with different algorithms, see what happens.

Additionally, do try calling h(-1)—and have fun!

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