Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Problem with Date function

output: 00:00am on Sunday December 17th, 2011

Problem hour and minutes always display 00:00 and sometime Year is also incorrect

Input date('Y-m-d H:i:s', time());

functions

public function perfect_date_format($date) {
    $dated = str_replace(array(" ", ":"), "-", $date);
    list($year, $month, $day, $hour, $minute) = explode("-", $date);
    $niceday = @date("H:ia \o\\n\ l, F jS, Y", mktime($hour, $minute, 0, $month, $day, $year));
    return $niceday;
  }
share|improve this question
1  
What is the input? And have you tried strtotime()? –  Jared Farrish Dec 17 '11 at 14:49
    
What is the desired output? –  Asaph Dec 17 '11 at 14:50
1  
can you provide your sample input? –  butchi Dec 17 '11 at 14:50
    
Show us the input $date string... –  Marc B Dec 17 '11 at 14:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have a typo. The 2nd argument to explode() should be $dated, rather than $date. If you do this, the time is correctly displayed.

<?php
function perfect_date_format($date) {
    $dated = str_replace(array(" ", ":"), "-", $date);
    list($year, $month, $day, $hour, $minute) = explode("-", $dated);
    $niceday = @date("H:ia \o\\n\ l, F jS, Y", mktime($hour, $minute, 0, $month, $day, $year));
    return $niceday;
}

echo perfect_date_format('2011-12-17 03:45:00') . "\n";
?>

This outputs:

03:45am on Saturday, December 17th, 2011

BTW: It's safe to remove the error suppressor operator (ie. @) in the code above. It was simply suppressing errors or warnings caused by the bug identified above. Now that the bug is fixed, the @ isn't doing anything.

share|improve this answer
    
Demo: codepad.org/GGKoabbT –  Jared Farrish Dec 17 '11 at 14:55
1  
Nice catch @Asaph, and your answer leaves his original code intact whereas I completely rewrote his function. +1. –  Josh Dec 17 '11 at 14:59
1  
I gave both an upvote, but I would prefer the strtotime() method, since it allows for more diversity of input (depending on usage). I'd also probably suggest removing the error suppressor on date(). –  Jared Farrish Dec 17 '11 at 15:01
1  
I agree that strtotime() is a more elegant approach. There are 2 ways to approach questions like this. My approach answers the question "Why is my code not working?" and @Josh answers the question "What is the best way to do what I'm trying to do?". Both are valid and the OP is free to decide which one serves him better. –  Asaph Dec 17 '11 at 15:09
1  
@Jared Farrish: I also agree about removing the @ operator. The only purpose it was serving was suppressing errors or warnings caused by the bug I identified in the code. Now that the bug is fixed, it's doing nothing. The error suppressor operator usually just masks problems and I personally avoid it. I left it in the answer because I just wanted to fix the bug and not make any distracting "enhancements". –  Asaph Dec 17 '11 at 15:15

It's very difficult to know hot to correct your code without knowing what you're passing to perfect_date_format, but I'll make a wild guess and assume that strtotime understands how to parse your $date:

public function perfect_date_format($date) {
    $time = strtotime($date);
    return date("H:ia \o\\n\ l, F jS, Y", $time);
}

If that doesn't work, then please provide the format of the data you're passing as $date.

share|improve this answer
1  
Demo: codepad.org/prOR1vnA –  Jared Farrish Dec 17 '11 at 14:55
    
Thanks @JaredFarrish! –  Josh Dec 17 '11 at 14:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.