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I need to move the contents of every second line up to the line above such that line2's data is alongside line1's, either comma or space separated works.

Input:

line1
line2
line3
line4

Output:

line1 line2
line3 line4

I've been doing it in vim with a simple recording but vim seems to crash when I tell it to do it 100 000 times... I'm thinking maybe sed would be a good alternative but not sure how to do what I want or maybe there's a better option?

Each line only contains 1 numerical value, I just have a million lines...

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1  
Please format your question, and show us proper input and expected output. –  Zsolt Botykai Dec 17 '11 at 15:17

6 Answers 6

If I understand correctly, you have:

line1 
line2
line3
line4
...

and you want:

line1<SEP>line2
line3<SEP>line4

then you can do it easily with (g)awk like this:

awk 'NR % 2 == 1 { o=$0 ; next } { print o "<sep>" $0 }' INPUTFILE

See it in action here.

Update: if the number of lines is odd, the above will omit the last line (as Martin Stettner pointed out) so this will not:

awk 'NR % 2 == 1 { o=$0 ; next } { print o "<sep>" $0 } END { if ( NR % 2 == 1 ) { print o } }' INPUTFILE

HTH

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1  
Wouldn't this script omit the last line in case you have an odd number of lines? –  MartinStettner Dec 19 '11 at 0:07
    
@MartinStettner you are right. Updating the solution. –  Zsolt Botykai Dec 19 '11 at 7:05

try this:

sed -rn 'N;s/\n/ /;p' yourFile

test with seq:

kent$  seq 10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

kent$  seq 10|sed -rn 'N;s/\n/ /;p'
1 2
3 4
5 6
7 8
9 10

awk works too:

awk 'NR%2{printf $0" ";next;}1' yourFile

test

kent$  seq 10|awk 'NR%2{printf $0" ";next;}1'
1 2
3 4
5 6
7 8
9 10
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This might work for you:

sed 'N;s/\n/ /' file

Or

cat file | paste -d' ' - - 
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Well your example is this in Vim.

:g/^/+t.|-j

But then what about the last line?

Or did you mean this?

:g/^/j

You might also be interested in this Vim script, which makes dealing with large files easier.

http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=1506

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Hi,wow, i knew there had to be a better way than I was trying!! :) Thanks for the loads of options, :g/^/j was the most simple and does the job great! –  janeruthh Dec 20 '11 at 6:37
    
Edited the OP following the above clarification above. The first suggestion in my answer can now be ignored. –  mintsauce Dec 20 '11 at 11:28
$ seq 10 | sed '2~2G' | awk -v RS='' '{$1=$1; print}'
1 2
3 4
5 6
7 8
9 10

$ paste -d' ' <(sed -n 'p;n' num.txt) <(sed -n 'n;p' num.txt)
1 2
3 4
5 6
7 8
9 10

$ echo -e 'g/^/,+1j\n%p' | ex num.txt
1 2
3 4
5 6
7 8
9 10

$ seq 10 | awk 'NR%2{printf("%s ", $0); next}1'
1 2
3 4
5 6
7 8
9 10

$ seq 10 | sed 'N;s/\n/ /'
1 2
3 4
5 6
7 8
9 10

note: $ seq 10 >num.txt

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How about perl? seq 10 | perl -pe '$a++%2||s/\n/ /' –  Sorpigal Dec 19 '11 at 15:25

The paste command can do this. Its "-s" option will join consecutive lines; and the "-d" option specifies a list of characters to use as delimiters, repeating them cyclically. Join first with a space, then with a newline, and repeat:

seq 10 | paste -sd" \n" -
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