Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to code a very basic lightmeter application for use with my old 35mm cameras using my Galaxy S2 as the sensor.

I should point out first of all that there is a hidden/test mode available on this phone selected by entering star hash zero star hash, on the dialller keypad then selecting 'sensor'. This makes available the light sensor which shows a range of Lux values varying between 5 and over 2000 in steps of 5 as I vary the light level.

The very simple proof of concept code I have written will only show me three values, namely 10, 100 and 1000 over the same range of lighting condtions. My code is:

public class LightMeterActivity extends Activity implements SensorEventListener {

    private SensorManager mSensorManager;
    private Sensor mLightSensor;
    private float mLux = 0.0f;

    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);
        mSensorManager = (SensorManager) getSystemService(SENSOR_SERVICE);
        mLightSensor = mSensorManager.getDefaultSensor(Sensor.TYPE_LIGHT);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onResume() {
        super.onResume();
        mSensorManager.registerListener(this, mLightSensor,
                SensorManager.SENSOR_DELAY_FASTEST);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onPause() {
        mSensorManager.unregisterListener(this);
        super.onPause();
    }

    @Override
    public void onAccuracyChanged(Sensor arg0, int arg1) {}

    @Override
    public void onSensorChanged(SensorEvent event) {
        if (event.sensor.getType() == Sensor.TYPE_LIGHT) {
            mLux = event.values[0];
            String luxStr = String.valueOf(mLux);
            TextView tv = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.textView1);
            tv.setText(luxStr);
            Log.d("LUXTAG", "Lux value: " + event.values[0] );

        }
    }
}

Can anybody suggest why this might be?

I have seen the question Light sensor on Nexus One returns only two distinct values which didn't help at all. I can't understand how the built in test mode can see the full range and my code can't.

share|improve this question
    
Aren't 50 rep a bit less for such a kinda complicated question? :p –  aoeu Jan 7 '12 at 1:16
    
@Michael: You wasted your time then didn't you? If you think that sort of attitude will make you popular on Stack Overflow, you are badly mistaken. –  NickT Jan 8 '12 at 11:00
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I only tested this on the Galaxy S2 but the only way I could see the true value was to get it directly the system device file:

#cat "/sys/devices/virtual/lightsensor/switch_cmd/lightsensor_file_state"

or in java:

Scanner st = new Scanner(new File("/sys/devices/virtual/lightsensor/switch_cmd/lightsensor_file_state"));
int lux = st.nextInt();
st.close();
share|improve this answer
    
This actually works! Thank you. I thought it would need root privileges, but it doesn't. –  NickT Feb 20 '12 at 16:01
add comment

Maybe there is another light sensor that is used by default by your system. I wrote an application that simply outputs the information about the sensors:

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.main);

    mSensorManager = (SensorManager) getSystemService(SENSOR_SERVICE);

    mLightSensorList = mSensorManager.getSensorList(Sensor.TYPE_LIGHT);
    tvSensorList = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.tvSensorList);
    StringBuilder sensorInfo = new StringBuilder("");
    if (mLightSensorList != null) {
        Log.d("Yury", mLightSensorList.toString());
        for (Sensor s : mLightSensorList) {
            sensorInfo.append("Sensor name: ");
            sensorInfo.append(s.getName());
            sensorInfo.append(" vendor: ");
            sensorInfo.append(s.getVendor());
            sensorInfo.append(" ver.: ");
            sensorInfo.append(s.getVersion());
            sensorInfo.append(" resolution: ");
            sensorInfo.append(s.getResolution());
            sensorInfo.append(" maxRange: ");
            sensorInfo.append(s.getMaximumRange());
            sensorInfo.append("\n");
        }
        tvSensorList.setText(sensorInfo.toString());
    }



    mLightSensor = mSensorManager.getDefaultSensor(Sensor.TYPE_LIGHT);
}

You can test your device. Considering several values on Nexus One. I tested your application on Nexus One and at first I received only two values 10 and 225. But then I put the phone under the lamp and received a lot of values. But the set of the values is limited while the resolution of the sensor is 1f. I do not know why this happens.

share|improve this answer
    
The phone has only one light sensor, which is a CM3663 Light Sensor manufactured by Capella Microsystems, Inc. This is only to be expected, as I can think of no reason why a device would have two or more such sensors. –  NickT Jan 7 '12 at 18:49
    
In the documentation I found that there can be several sensors in the device. getDefaultSensor can return just first sensor, or can make a fake sensor that will take average of several real sensors. However, try to put your phone under the lamp, and also check maxRange of your sensor. –  Yury Jan 7 '12 at 18:54
    
I had already got a list of sensors of type Sensor.TYPE_LIGHT. There was one entry in it as described. Its maximum range is 3000.0. Of course I put the phone under a bright light. It read 1000.0. –  NickT Jan 7 '12 at 19:00
    
Then I do not know. Sorry! –  Yury Jan 7 '12 at 19:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.