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I have a strange problem in C about including header files.

main.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "location.h"

int waste_new_line();

int main()
{
    location *crossroads = malloc(sizeof(*crossroads));
...

location.h

typedef struct Location_Struct location;

location.c

typedef struct Location_Struct {
    int ID;
    char *name;
    char *description;
} location;

int setup_location(location* l, char* name)
{
    ...

Now this isn't working because

location *crossroads = malloc(sizeof(*crossroads));

is throwing an error:dereferencing pointer to incomplete type meaning that it can see the contents of location.h, yet it doesn't seem to be aware of location.c...

I've looked around and all the tutorials I've seen say that the linker will link both files together.

EDIT:

I have altered the code to include an initializer inside location.c as so:

main.c

...
#include "location.h"

int waste_new_line();

int main()
{

    location *crossroads = initialize_location();
    ....

location.h

typedef struct Location_Struct location;

location* initialize_location();

location.c

...
typedef struct Location_Struct {
    int ID;
    char *name;
    char *description;
} location;

location* initialize_location(location* l)
{
    return malloc(sizeof(location));
}
...

This is still throwing the same error, yet only when I try and access the members of crossroads using:

crossroads->description

this will throw the deferencing to incomplete type error.

EDIT 2: For now I've decided to just put the struct definition in the header file...

share|improve this question
    
location *crossroads = malloc(sizeof(location)); –  Krister Andersson Dec 17 '11 at 15:57
    
The files are linked together, but not by the compiler (or at least not by the part of the compiler than concerns itself with your C source code). Which tutorials state something else? –  delnan Dec 17 '11 at 15:58
2  
@Krister: No, the OP's method should be preferred. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 17 '11 at 15:58
    
@delnan: sorry I meant the linker –  Joe Bentley Dec 17 '11 at 16:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This behaviour is expected. When you #include "location.h", only the header file is visible to the compiler. The location.c file comes along later, at link time.

You have two options:

  1. Add a function, which you declare in location.h and define in location.c, which does the necessary malloc and returns a pointer.
  2. Move the full definition of the struct to the header file.
share|improve this answer
    
Would number 2 be an option if I needed to use location as parameters of functions in location.c? I would have to include location.h again to be able to access the data structure in both location.c, would that be bad practise? –  Joe Bentley Dec 17 '11 at 16:18
1  
@JoeBentley: It is standard practice to include .h in the corresponding .c. That way, the compiler can check that your function declarations and definitions match. –  ibid Dec 17 '11 at 17:51
    
I see, thank you! –  Joe Bentley Dec 17 '11 at 22:17

The main file knows about a struct called Location_Struct (and a typedef). It has no idea how big it is, thus you can't apply sizeof to it.

Since you are effectively hiding the layout and the implementation of Location_Struct it makes sense to provide a "constructor" that allocates it.

EDIT

It seems I have to mention that by "constructor" I mean an ordinary function that has access to the implementation of the structure and can allocate and possibly pre-populate the object.

share|improve this answer
1  
C does not have constructors. –  Alok Save Dec 17 '11 at 16:00
    
-1 For trying to justify and pass off the usage of term constructor which by no means is standard nor popular nor common in C.A mere acceptance of slipage would have sufficed. –  Alok Save Dec 17 '11 at 16:16
3  
@Als: I think you're being too harsh. Using constructor-like functions in pure C is a very sensible design pattern. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 17 '11 at 16:18
    
I'm not sure whether to make a function that does that or simply include the full struct definition in location.h –  Joe Bentley Dec 17 '11 at 16:20
    
@OliCharlesworth: constructor like function would be a valid usage instead of constructor which is very likely to mislead a new user to be giving funny ideas about something that does not exist. –  Alok Save Dec 17 '11 at 16:21

You need to put the definition of Location_Struct in the header file location.h. The compiler would not "see" the other source file (unless it were #include'd, which would not typically be a good idea).

share|improve this answer
    
But then I have to #include location.h in location.c too as functions in location.h take type location as parameters, is it bad practise to #include location.h in location.c as well as main.c? It would solve my problem, but I'm cautious about whether it's a good idea or not, I don't want it to cause me trouble in the future... –  Joe Bentley Dec 17 '11 at 17:04
1  
@JoeBentley: That is actually the correct thing to do. Every source file that uses a structure needs its full definition. –  Mark Wilkins Dec 17 '11 at 17:35
    
Thanks a lot! Cleared up any worries I had. –  Joe Bentley Dec 17 '11 at 17:36

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