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How can I check for nulls in a deep lamda expression?

Say for example I have a class structure that was nested several layers deep, and I wanted to execute the following lambda:

x => x.Two.Three.Four.Foo

I want it to return null if Two, Three, or Four were null, rather than throwing a System.NullReferenceException.

public class Tests
{
    // This test will succeed
    [Fact]
    public void ReturnsValueWhenClass2NotNull()
    {
        var one = new One();
        one.Two = new Two();
        one.Two.Three = new Three();
        one.Two.Three.Four = new Four();
        one.Two.Three.Four.Foo = "blah";

        var result = GetValue(one, x => x.Two.Three.Four.Foo);

        Assert.Equal("blah", result);
    }

    // This test will fail
    [Fact]
    public void ReturnsNullWhenClass2IsNull()
    {
        var one = new One();

        var result = GetValue(one, x => x.Two.Three.Four.Foo);

        Assert.Equal(null, result);
    }

    private TResult GetValue<TModel, TResult>(TModel model, Expression<Func<TModel, TResult>> expression)
    {
        var func = expression.Compile();
        var value = func(model);
        return value;
    }

    public class One
    {
        public Two Two { get; set; }
    }

    public class Two
    {
        public Three Three { get; set; }
    }

    public class Three
    {
        public Four Four { get; set; }
    }

    public class Four
    {
        public string Foo { get; set; }
        public string Bar { get; set; }
    }
}

UPDATE:

One solution would be to catch the NullReferenceException like this:

    private TResult GetValue<TModel, TResult>(TModel model, Expression<Func<TModel, TResult>> expression)
    {
        TResult value;
        try
        {
            var func = expression.Compile();
            value = func(model);
        }
        catch (NullReferenceException)
        {
            value = default(TResult);
        }
        return value;
    }

But I hate to incur the expense of catching an exception that is not, in my mind, exceptional. I expect this to be the case quite often in my domain.

UPDATE 2:

Another solution would be modify the property getters like this:

    public class One
    {
        private Two two;
        public Two Two
        {
            get
            {
                return two ?? new Two();
            }
            set
            {
                two = value;
            }
        }
    }

Which is mostly ok for my domain, but there are times when I really to expect a property to return null. I checked the answer from Josh E as helpful since it comes pretty close to what I need in some cases.

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Mena, Hinata, James Donnelly, Adam Oct 10 '13 at 7:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can't do that in a concise way. You can either make the lambda multiple lines, or use nested ternary operators:

var result = GetValue(one, x => x.Two == null ? null :
                                x.Two.Three == null ? null :
                                x.Two.Three.Four == null ? null :
                                x.Two.Three.Four.Foo;

Ugly, I know.

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2  
this is far more concise one.Maybe(x=>x.Two.Three.Four.Foo); see maybe.codeplex.com –  Maslow Jun 3 '10 at 18:21
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You could do this with a generic helper extension method, something like:

public static class Get {
	public static T IfNotNull<T, U>(this U item, Func<U, T> lambda) where U: class {
		if (item == null) {
			return default(T);
		}
		return lambda(item);
	}
}

var one = new One();
string fooIfNotNull = one.IfNotNull(x => x.Two).IfNotNull(x => x.Three).IfNotNull(x => x.Four).IfNotNull(x => x.Foo);
share|improve this answer
    
In that case, I'd want to return the default value for whatever type Foo or Bar were. What I really want to avoid is the exception if something further up in the expression tree was null. –  JohnRudolfLewis May 12 '09 at 20:09
    
I edited my answer and added a code sample, which compiles fine and should do the trick. –  Lucero May 12 '09 at 21:08
    
That easy? That elegant? +1 And no runtime performance hit due to reflection. Did anyone benchmark this against Gabe's solution or the 'normal' approach? –  Simon D. Mar 12 '11 at 0:48
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Doing this concisely requires an as-yet-unimplemented operator. We considered adding an operator ".?" to C# 4.0 which would have your desired semantics, but unfortunately it did not fit into our budget. We'll consider it for a hypothetical future version of the language.

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This would be great! Delphi prism does the same with its ":" operator: prismwiki.codegear.com/en/Colon_Operator –  Gabe Moothart May 13 '09 at 18:25
    
I second that. This would make lots of code so much cleaner! –  mdonatas May 24 '12 at 16:16
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You can now do using the Maybe project on codeplex.

Syntax is:

string result = One.Maybe(o => o.Two.Three.Four.Foo);

string cityName = Employee.Maybe(e => e.Person.Address.CityName);
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Does using expression tree effects performance? –  Michael Freidgeim Jun 2 '12 at 0:26
3  
does doing something different change the performance characteristics? yes. is it actually enough that you or a user would notice? I don't know your usage, profile it. –  Maslow Jun 2 '12 at 20:52
    
Do you have any performance stats of your (or someone else) usage? –  Michael Freidgeim Jun 2 '12 at 21:09
2  
I do not. If you try it out perhaps you could share the results with me? =) –  Maslow Jun 2 '12 at 21:15
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I've written an extension method which enables you to do this:

blah.GetValueOrDefault(x => x.Two.Three.Four.Foo);

It uses Expression Trees to build a nested conditional checking for nulls at each node before returning the expression value; the created expression tree is compiled to a Func and cached, so subsequent uses of the same call should run at almost native speed.

You can also pass in a default value to return if you like:

blah.GetValueOrDefault(x => x.Two.Three.Four.Foo, Foo.Empty);

I've written a blog about it here.

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I'm not skilled in c#, but maybe there's some way to implement the "andand" pattern from ruby that solves exactly this problem without polluting the implementation.

The concept is also known as the Maybe Monad in Haskell.

The title of this article seems promising.

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1  
Interesting, the article is almost identical to the solution I came up by thinking about it, see my post... –  Lucero May 12 '09 at 21:16
    
Wow, completely missed it, I guess I was looking for the word "maybe" –  krusty.ar May 12 '09 at 21:26
    
maybe.codeplex.com can do it. –  Maslow Jun 3 '10 at 18:20
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Always initialize your properties before using them. Add a constructor to class One, Two, Three and Four. In the constructor initialize your properties so they are not null.

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I usually do, but in this domain, the properties can get set to null sometimes. This is valid behavior. –  JohnRudolfLewis May 12 '09 at 20:20
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You could modify your getters to read something like:

private Two _two;
public Two Two
{
     get 
     {
       if (null == _two)
         return new Two();
       else
         return _two;
      }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Modifying the implementation to save some lines in the client code should fire all kinds of alarms. –  krusty.ar May 12 '09 at 21:32
1  
I tend to disagree that this is an issue: I would call this defensive coding. The code above ensures that the value of a property is never null without sharing that knowledge with any consumer of that property / object. –  Josh E May 12 '09 at 21:34
1  
If I keep calling Two while _two is null, I keep getting new instances of Two... ew –  Lucas May 12 '09 at 23:25
1  
good point. In that case, you could modify it to set _two to a new Two() instance before returning it, e.g. if (null == _two) _two = new Two(); return _two; –  Josh E May 13 '09 at 14:03
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I find the coalesce operator useful for this at times. This only helps though if there is a default/null equivalent version of the object you can drop in.

For instance, sometimes when I'm cracking open XML...

IEnumeratable<XElement> sample;
sample.Where(S => (S.Attribute["name"] ?? new XAttribute("name","")).Value.StartsWith("Hello"))...

Depending on how the default objects are retrieved this can be verbose, and the above example is not a great use but you get the idea. For the particular case of reading XML attributes I have an extension method that returns the attribute value or an empty string.

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I converted a function that used a lot of if statements to avoid the nulls to the .IFNotNull method for classes that I converted from an XSD that are 4 and 5 levels deep.

Here are a few lines of the converted code:

ProdYear.PRIOR_CUMULATIVE_CARBON_DIOXIDE_VALUE = year.IfNotNull(x => x.PRIOR_CUMULATIVE).IfNotNull(y => y.CARBON_DIOXIDE).IfNotNull(z => z.VALUE).ToDouble();  
ProdYear.PRIOR_CUMULATIVE_CARBON_DIOXIDE_UOM = year.IfNotNull(x => x.PRIOR_CUMULATIVE).IfNotNull(y => y.CARBON_DIOXIDE).IfNotNull(z => z.UOM);  

Here are some interesting stats about it:

1) This new method took 3.7409 times longer to run that the variation with the If Statements.
2) I decreased my function line count from 157 to 59.
3) CodeRush from DevExpress has a "Maintenance Complexity" score. When I converted to the Lambda statements, it increased from 984 to 2076, which is theoretically much harder to maintain.

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