Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm not entirely sure how to phrase this as a concise question title.

I have a games table which contains of records representing games of a player against another. The relevant columns of this table are userid1 and userid2. I have another table called accounts, consisting of the columns id and username.

I'd like to fetch the username of the opponent from the accounts table. The opponent is the user of which the id is not equal to the known user id. So, if userid1 = 123 then I'd like to fetch accounts.username of the user where accounts.id is equal to userid2 of the same games record. The same goes the other way round if userid2 = 123.

I've so far only been able to select the opponent's username separately using two queries:

SELECT * FROM games, accounts
WHERE games.userid1 = 123 AND accounts.id = games.userid2

and:

SELECT * FROM games, accounts
WHERE games.userid2 = 123 AND accounts.id = games.userid1
(swapped:         ^                                     ^)

However, I'd like to combine these two queries nicely into one. So, is it possible to get accounts.username where accounts.id is equal to:

  • games.userid2 if games.userid1 is equal to the known user id
  • games.userid1 if games.userid2 is equal to the known user id

and if so, how?

share|improve this question
1  
Doesn't a simple OR work? –  Mat Dec 17 '11 at 16:40
    
@Mat: That does the trick just great. I'm trying to grasp the basics, forgive my ignorance... –  pimvdb Dec 17 '11 at 16:43
    
Implicit joins shouldn't be used in favor of explicit joins. –  outis Dec 17 '11 at 19:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use a case statement in your join condition, something like this:

SELECT * FROM games g
    JOIN accounts a 
      ON a.id = case g.userid1 when ? then g.userid2 else g.userid1 end
WHERE 
    g.userid1 = ? OR g.userid2 = ?

However, depending on your indexes, it may be quicker to use a union, eg.

  SELECT * FROM games g
      JOIN accounts a ON a.id = case g.userid2
  WHERE g.userid1 = ?
UNION ALL
  SELECT * FROM games g
      JOIN accounts a ON a.id = case g.userid1
  WHERE g.userid2 = ?

An alternative query using OR,

SELECT * FROM games g, accounts a 
WHERE 
      (g.userid1 = ? AND g.userid2 = a.id) 
   OR (g.userid2 = ? AND g.userid1 = a.id)
share|improve this answer
    
The case statement works great, thanks. However, it seems SELECT * FROM games, accounts WHERE games.userid2 = 123 AND accounts.id = games.userid1 OR games.userid1 = 123 AND accounts.id = games.userid2 (using Mat's suggestion) selects the same records. Is there possibly a difference between your solution and this one? This one seems a little bit more complex. –  pimvdb Dec 17 '11 at 16:56
1  
It looks like it will do the same. Ultimately, you need to test to ensure you are getting the data that you expect. And always look at the explain output especially if you will be running this over a large dataset. –  a'r Dec 17 '11 at 17:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.