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There's:

$myvar="somthing";

and:

define('myvar', 'something');

I know the first one is defining a variable and I thought the second one was too, until someone told me its not...

Whats the difference between the two? They both do the same things right?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The second one creates a constant. Syntactically, it's a lot like a variable, except that it can't be varied.

See http://php.net/manual/en/function.define.php, or more generally http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.constants.php.

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ahh! But cant you just use const something="somthing"; for that? –  user849137 Dec 17 '11 at 16:42
    
edit: nevermind, in PHP they do the exact same thing, yes. –  Logan Serman Dec 17 '11 at 16:44
    
You can. Just read php.net/manual/en/language.constants.syntax.php –  Nanne Dec 17 '11 at 16:44
    
Okay cool. Thanks guys. –  user849137 Dec 17 '11 at 16:45

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