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I've never used conditionals before (but knew I would eventually have to -- I hate you IE). Basically, I have a banner at the top of my website using a css gradient:

background-image: linear-gradient(bottom, #2B7BB8 44%, #4394CE 72%, #58A8E1 86%);
background-image: -o-linear-gradient(bottom, #2B7BB8 44%, #4394CE 72%, #58A8E1 86%);
background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(bottom, #2B7BB8 44%, #4394CE 72%, #58A8E1 86%);
background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(bottom, #2B7BB8 44%, #4394CE 72%, #58A8E1 86%);
background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(bottom, #2B7BB8 44%, #4394CE 72%, #58A8E1 86%);

background-image: -webkit-gradient(
    linear,
    left bottom,
    left top,
    color-stop(0.44, #2B7BB8),
    color-stop(0.72, #4394CE),
    color-stop(0.86, #58A8E1)
);

So I added a conditional statement to load a gradient image I prepared in the GIMP for all versions of IE:

<!--[if IE]> background-image:url('img/ieback.png'); <![endif]-->
<!--[if IE]> background-repeat:repeat-x; <![endif]-->

I don't have IE on my computer (linux) so I used Adobe Browser Labs to test what my website looks like in IE. However, the image still doesn't load. The final version of my css looks like this:

background-image: linear-gradient(bottom, #2B7BB8 44%, #4394CE 72%, #58A8E1 86%);
background-image: -o-linear-gradient(bottom, #2B7BB8 44%, #4394CE 72%, #58A8E1 86%);
background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(bottom, #2B7BB8 44%, #4394CE 72%, #58A8E1 86%);
background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(bottom, #2B7BB8 44%, #4394CE 72%, #58A8E1 86%);
background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(bottom, #2B7BB8 44%, #4394CE 72%, #58A8E1 86%);

background-image: -webkit-gradient(
    linear,
    left bottom,
    left top,
    color-stop(0.44, #2B7BB8),
    color-stop(0.72, #4394CE),
    color-stop(0.86, #58A8E1)
);

<!--[if IE]> background-image:url('img/ieback.png'); <![endif]-->
<!--[if IE]> background-repeat:repeat-x; <![endif]-->

Am I doing something wrong?

share|improve this question
    
What about when IE10 is released and it supports CSS3 gradients? Use feature detection not browser detection – Adam Casey Dec 17 '11 at 17:17
    
Good point, I'll change it to if lt IE9 – n0pe Dec 17 '11 at 17:18
1  
Actually I looked it up and Microsoft are removing conditional comments in IE10, and gradients aren't supported in IE9 so you are OK to do <!--[if IE]--> – Adam Casey Dec 17 '11 at 17:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

http://www.quirksmode.org/css/condcom.html

It appears you can't do conditional comments in the CSS file, only in the HTML file.

So if you wrapped a style element in an <!--[if IE]> <![endif]--> it should work

Having looked it up, CSS3 gradients are only supported in IE10 and conditional comments have been removed in IE10. So you can just target all versions of IE with that conditional comment.

share|improve this answer

Best practice is to use feature detection, not browser sniffing or conditional comments. And, moreover, these conditional comments will disappear in IE10, I understand, so this will stop working soon.

Regardless, you should check out two projects (FOSS of course): Modernizr.com (I don't think this will help directly here though) and h5bp.com (HTML5 Boilerplate dot com). The latter is chock full of great best practices and one in particular is to use conditional comments in the HTML like so:

<!doctype html> (you don't have to use HTML5 here, this will still work)
<!--[if lt IE 7]> <html class="no-js ie678 ie6" lang="en"> <![endif]-->
<!--[if IE 7]>    <html class="no-js ie678 ie7" lang="en"> <![endif]-->
<!--[if IE 8]>    <html class="no-js ie678 ie8" lang="en"> <![endif]-->
<!--[if gt IE 8]><!--> <html class="no-js" lang="en"> <!--<![endif]-->

Note that this essentially sets different classes on your html element. So, if the user is using IE8, then there will be a class ie8 AND ie678 on the HTML element.

Then, in your CSS, you merely need to do something like this:

.ie678 { background-image:url('img/ieback.png'); }
.ie678 { background-repeat:repeat-x; }

And naturally, these two style rules will be enabled.

Best of luck!

PS. I mention Modernizr.com above because its all about feature detection. You can use it to detect whether CSS Gradients are supported, but it won't necessarily tell you if the IE filters will work. However, you could simply detect if the gradients work, if not, then use an MS-filter and hope for the best. I suspect that the Conditional Comments are more what you're after though.

share|improve this answer
    
This is cool, I didn't know that. Thanks – n0pe Dec 17 '11 at 17:33

This should work:

/* For Internet Explorer 8 */
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(startColorstr='#FFFFFF', endColorstr='#E1E1E1');
share|improve this answer

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