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I am preparing for SCJP and I got confused while reading about nested types. There is a simple question and I am not able to understand the result.

public class Outer {
    private int innerCounter;

    class Inner {
        Inner() {
            innerCounter++;
        }

        public String toString() {
            return String.valueOf(innerCounter);
        }
    }

    private void multiply() {
        Inner inner = new Inner();
        this.new Inner();
        System.out.print(inner);
        inner = new Outer().new Inner();
        System.out.println(inner);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Outer().multiply();
    }
}

It prints

21

Knowing that the counter is not static, how are the first two objects considered as one object?

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I suggest you try the code in the debugger to see if this shows you what is really happening. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 17 '11 at 18:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A non-static inner class has access to all of the members of its outer class. It's like it was really defined as:

class Outer {

    private int innerCount;

    class Inner() {
        private final Outer owner;

        public Inner(Outer owner) {
            this.owner = owner;
            this.owner.innerCount++;
        }
    }

    private void multiply() {
        Inner inner = new Inner(this);
        ...
    }
}

So let me annotate your method:

private void multiply() {
    // this.innerCount = 0

    Inner inner = new Inner();
    // this.innerCount = 1

    this.new Inner();
    // this.innerCount = 2

    System.out.print(inner);  // Prints "2"

    // Creates a new Outer (with a separate innerCount)
    // then uses that to create a new Inner, which updates
    // the new innerCount
    inner = new Outer().new Inner();
    // inner.innerCount = 1

    System.out.println(inner);  // Prints "1"
}
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but why the first object "inner" is considered this.inner? –  Sleiman Jneidi Dec 17 '11 at 18:22
    
@sleimanjneidi: It isn't. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 17 '11 at 18:23
    
@sleimanjneidi: I think you're confused by this.new Inner(); - because Inner is an inner class, the outer class can call its constructor through the 'this' operator. Note that the constructor of an inner class can not be called outside the class. It can not be called in the main method, for instance. –  W.K.S Dec 17 '11 at 18:32

I assume that you're talking about the Inner objects. Well they're not considered as one object but they're linked to the same Outer object (this)

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Instantiating a non-static inner class requires a reference to the "outer" class. In the case of the method multiply, you already have a instance of Outer active and hence both new Inner() and this.new Inner() refer to the same Outer object but are unique objects themselves. Basically, all nested non-static class instances are internally always tied to an Outer class instance.

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I didn't get what you were referring to as 'two first objects', but innerCounter is a field of an Outer class.

In your code you create two instances of Outer - here new Outer().multiply(); and here inner = new Outer().new Inner();.

The first Outer instance's innerCounter gets incremented by calling Inner constructor two times (Inner inner = new Inner(); and this.new Inner();), the second - just once (inner = new Outer().new Inner();).

Thus you're getting 2 and 1 as output.

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Inner inner = new Inner();
Inner inner = this.new Inner();

both the above are same because both are refering to the currently running instance of Outer. Same as below:

private int number;

public int getNumber(){
    return this.number;
}

public int getNumber(){
    return number;
}

Here too in both the method refer to the same instance so this is not affecting the output.

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I don't understand where your confusion is, but I'll try and explain why it prints 21. Please see the inline comments

Note: objects are named for explanation sake.


public class Outer {
private int innerCounter;

class Inner { Inner() { innerCounter++; }

public String toString() {
    return String.valueOf(innerCounter);
}

}

private void multiply() { Inner inner = new Inner();//Step2: Create first inner object //Lets call it innerA //Note innerA is created using outerA //Increments the innerCount variable of outerA this.new Inner(); //step3 create second inner object //Lets call it innerB //Note innerB is created using outerA //Increments the innerCount variable of outerA

System.out.print(inner); //step 3 print innerCount from outerA
//With the two increments done, prints 2
inner = new Outer().new Inner(); //step4 create second outer object
//Lets call it outerB.
//Lets call this third inner object as InnerC
//InnerC creation increments OuterB's innerCount variable (so value 1)
//Assigned now to the old reference
System.out.println(inner); // prints the value of innerC

}

public static void main(String[] args) { new Outer().multiply(); //Step1: Create the first outer object //Lets call it OuterA

} }

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