Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to learn using databases correctly by myself and now I realised, that although I have used these concepts before, I don't really know what's the difference between them:

What is a transaction? What is a lock?

As far as I know, when using a transaction, all instructions are executed as one, so another user can not interfere. So why would I use a lock in this case? When should I use locking and when transactions?

I am using MySQL, if it matters...

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Transactions are used when you are executing queries and wish to have a mechanism to reverse the resulting modifications if there is a possibility of error during their execution.

Locking in mysql is used to gain exclusive mode to certain table and perform much faster insert/delete queries, most often for bulk data upload into a heavy usage database.

share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't a lock time-consuming? –  Dragos Dec 17 '11 at 18:36
    
@Dragos if you do locking under heavy usage, locking should be used with a sufficient data amount to reduce the speed penalty –  Ulterior Dec 17 '11 at 18:38

The transaction is a unit, it is necessary for guaranteed atomicity, or all of these steps are done or not done any. It is necessary to do so because normally the operations on the database require you to perform various operations of reading, writing, and others, and only successful execution of all ensures compliance to the target.

To better understand read about ACID (atomicity, consistency, isolation, durability), these are the characteristics that guarantee that a transaction is processed reliably.

share|improve this answer
    
So a transaction is handled automatically, or do I have to test everything and in case of failure make a rollback myself? –  Dragos Dec 17 '11 at 19:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.