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In a C++ application I create in various points of a class User objects of a particular class Vehicle with operator new and right after each instantiation I put them in a vector which is a property of the first class (i.e. vector< Vehicle* > v1).

  1. At the running time of the program it is likely I need to some point to delete the objects of class Vehicle. Should I use definitely the operator delete? If so, how is this be done to a vector? Is there any predefined function of the vector to do the same work? When I delete them, what happens to the properties of Vehicle class, which in this occasion are pointers to other Objects? Are they also deleted?

  2. If it is no need to delete them until the end of the program, are they deleted by the destructor or should delete them "manually"?

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Never use delete. Never use pointers. Only use new in the constructor of a smart pointer. –  Kerrek SB Dec 17 '11 at 18:46
    
@Kerrek: "Never use pointers" isn't correct. Never use owning raw pointers would be more correct. –  Xeo Dec 17 '11 at 20:06
    
@Xeo: Arguably, a raw pointer cannot really "own" in its own right -- its owniness is non-local, outside information. –  Kerrek SB Dec 17 '11 at 20:08

2 Answers 2

Here's the C++ way:

#include <memory>
#include <vector>

#include "vehicle.hpp"
typedef std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Vehicle>> vehicle_container;

#include "derivedvehicles.hpp"

int main()
{
    vehicle_container v;
    //...
    v.emplace_back(new Car);
    v.emplace_back(new Bike);
    //...
 } // baam, everything is cleaned up
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The "magic", of course, being unique_ptr (nee "auto_ptr", aka "smart pointer"). –  paulsm4 Dec 17 '11 at 18:52
    
So basically it is encouraged to use emplace_back all the time (unless you still need the object of which a copy you are adding) instead of push_back right? –  Seth Carnegie Dec 17 '11 at 18:58
    
Note that unique_ptr requires a C++11 compiler –  bdonlan Dec 17 '11 at 23:20
    
What is the point of the typedef? –  nwp Aug 10 at 15:35
    
@nwp: To separate the container design choice from the example code that uses it? –  Kerrek SB Aug 10 at 15:37

Here a better way (IMHO):

#include <boost/ptr_container/ptr_vector.hpp>

#include "vehicle.hpp"
typedef boost::ptr_vector<Vehicle> vehicle_container;

#include "derivedvehicles.hpp"

int main()
{
    vehicle_container v;
    //...
    v.emplace_back(new Car);
    v.emplace_back(new Bike);
    //...

    v[0].go();  // Elements accessed as if they are objects (not pointers)
                // Which makes using in any of the standard 
                // algorithms trivial.

} // ta-da, everything is cleaned up
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