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How can I read the value that a controller has set in a before_save callback?

Example:

I have a model with a url field. Before saving, I want to check if the url was changed. If so, do some stuff with both the new and old url.

Is that possible?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Try something like this:

before_save { |m| if m.url_changed? ... }

Also see the docs on ActiveModel::Dirty

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Thanks for changing your mind and undeleting your answer, this is the right approach. In particular, the url_changed?, url_was, and url_change methods are of interest. –  mu is too short Dec 17 '11 at 19:09
    
I ended up using paper_trail to accomplish this. –  Jacob Dec 18 '11 at 18:43

If it has changed it should be in the params hash. If it hasn't changed it shouldn't be in there. Therefore, you can put this custom handling into the controller, or in a method on the model that does this.

If you really want to access it inbefore_save check the documentation on ActiveRecord callbacks, and you will see how to access the before and after values.

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No, this sort of thing does not belong in the controller, the model should be responsible for managing its own internals. And what happens if url is modified as a side effect of setting a different property? Perhaps a before_validation hook looks at some other property and updates url, that's none of the controller's business. Or perhaps before_save is being used to track the model's revision history, that's none of the controller's business either. –  mu is too short Dec 17 '11 at 19:08
    
Understood. I was just offering multiple approaches, including the one that utilizes before_save. The original asker didn't really go into what it was that they wanted to do based on the value of the url (e.g. redirect somewhere else - something done in the controller), so I didn't want to assume what the purpose was. I was just pointing out the various places you could get to this information. –  jefflunt Dec 17 '11 at 20:03

I tried this thing but it did not work out

#Non-working code
before_save: record_old_value
after_save: record_change

def record_old_value
   @old_value = self.field
end

def record_change
   if @old_value==self.field
      create_record_in_history :old_value => @old_value, :new_value => self.field
   end
end

The reason it didn't work out was because we set self.field=new_value so in before_save it is not accessible. But rails has some more Active-record function like field_changed which can directly be used in both before_save and after_save. So I ended up with this solution

#working code
after_save :run_function
def run_function
   @old_value = field_was
   if @old_value==self.field
      create_record_in_history :old_value => @old_value, :new_value => self.field
   end
end
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  • better way

before :todo, if: :first_name_or_last_name_changed?

  • and your todo method

def first_name_or_last_name_changed?
   first_name_changed? || last_name_changed?
end

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Can you edit to reformat as a code block (Ctrl-K or four leading spaces) so this is more readable? Be sure to check the preview below the edit box. –  Nathan Tuggy Jun 22 at 2:48
    
how is that? thanks @NathanTuggy –  jamesdelacruz Jun 23 at 3:07
    
I think this is probably what you're looking for. –  Nathan Tuggy Jun 23 at 3:13

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