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I have a .vimrc file that contains the following line:

syntax match proper /\s[A-Z][a-zA-Z]*/

In theory, it should match any set of alphabetic characters that is prefixed by a space and starts with a capital letter. This works as it should when I run it with vim 7.3 on Ubuntu 11.11. However, when I sent the .vimrc to a server running vim 7.0 on CentOS 5.6, it matches all words prefixed by a space, not just the words that start with a capital letter.

I've been searching for a few hours to figure this out, but I'm baffled. I tried [[:upper:]] instead of [A-Z] but it came up with the same results. Using /[A-Z] and /[[:upper:]] to search properly selects only uppercase characters. Running ls | grep "[A-Z]" in bash only highlights files with uppercase characters.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My next best guess (after ignorecase) would be an error in the configuration of the syntax highlighting script itself:

Some languages are not case sensitive, such as Pascal. Others, such as C, are case sensitive. You need to tell which type you have with the following commands:

:syntax case match
:syntax case ignore

Could you try what happens when you specifically add :syntax case match to the mix (or spot where a spurious ignore is coming from)?

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syntax case match solved it! Thanks a bunch! –  nullflux Dec 18 '11 at 1:13

Have you accidentally turned ignorecase on? What do you get with /\s\C[A-Z]\c[A-Z]*/?

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3  
You should actually word it as an answer. Right now it should a comment. I suspect this really should be the answer, anyway so I'd suggest rewording. –  sehe Dec 17 '11 at 23:50
    
ignorecase and smartcase are both off. /\s\C[A-Z]\c[A-Z]*/ selected the exact same text as /\s[A-Z][a-zA-Z]*/ did, unfortunately. –  nullflux Dec 17 '11 at 23:58
    
@sehe Sometimes my answer morphs into a comment or vice versa while I'm composing it. Sorry about that. –  Neil Dec 18 '11 at 0:09

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