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Which command lets me to cout my new random numbers by presing enter? I tried to write system("pause") but then comes line "press any key to continue" which I dont like. Is there any possibility to just press enter button and see numbers one after one?

Here's the program code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctime>

int main()
{
    int i, k;

    srand(time(0));
    for (i = 0; i < 20; i++)
    {
        cout << (rand() % 8) << endl;
    }
}
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1  
This is homework, right? :-) –  Tom van der Woerdt Dec 18 '11 at 1:44
    
Try cin.readline() or if you can get away with not having to listen for enter specifically then cin.readchar(). –  M.Babcock Dec 18 '11 at 1:46
    
nope :) Really, I can't figure it out how to do it.. –  Edvinas Perminas Dec 18 '11 at 1:47
    
@M.Babcock: aren't you getting confused with the Console object of the .NET Framework? –  Matteo Italia Dec 18 '11 at 1:48
    
Why would you even want that? What a silly sort of program would gobble up arbitrary amounts of input as part of its normal operation? That'd be totally useless in any composition chain... just focus on writing something that's actually useful. –  Kerrek SB Dec 18 '11 at 1:49
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6 Answers

#include <limits>

// ...

cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');

The advantage over reading a single character is that this will make sure that no stray characters are left over into the buffer.

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Here is a slightly more modern C++ take on it:

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>
#include <random>

int main()
{
    std::mt19937 rng(std::time(0));
    std::uniform_int_distribution<int> gen(0,7);

    for (int i=0;i<20;i++)
    {
        std::cout << gen(rng);

        std::string line;
        std::getline(std::cin, line);
    };
}
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@KerrekSB g++ still eating it like a baby, which is why I keep forgetting without noting. –  sehe Dec 18 '11 at 1:54
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You can simply use getchar() which will read one keypress and then continue. If you want to specifically break on the enter key, use something like while (getchar() != "\n");

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Do not use getch. It is non-standard. Use getchar. –  Lalaland Dec 18 '11 at 1:47
    
It should be \n. –  Matteo Italia Dec 18 '11 at 1:47
    
getch is Borland C (and perhaps MSVC as well) extension to standard C via conio library. it's not part of the standard, and surely not available (by default) in most compilers (incl. gcc) –  LeleDumbo Dec 18 '11 at 1:49
    
That's what I get for using Google :-) Updated - I always use cin myself, but that produces output. –  Tom van der Woerdt Dec 18 '11 at 1:50
1  
Should be single quotes around \n. '\n'. "\n" is a cstring, not a char. –  Lalaland Dec 18 '11 at 1:50
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add cin >> SomeVariableThatCouldAcceptAnythingInCaseYouPressSomethingElseBeforeTheEnterKey either before or after the cout, whichever you like.

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Just read a string, right?

#include <string>
....


for (i=0;i<20;i++)
{
    std::string str;
    cin >> str; // this should pause until the user presses enter
    cout << (rand()%8) << endl;

};
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I think this waits until you really put at least one non-whitespace character in, doesn't it? –  Christian Rau Dec 18 '11 at 1:51
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What about a simple cin.get()? No need for any temporary variable nor any C functions.

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