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Take this example:

        int[] queryValues1 = new int[10] {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};
        int[] queryValues2 = new int[100]; // this is 0 to 100

        for (int i = 0; i < queryValues2.Length; i++)
        {
            queryValues2[i] = i;
        }

        var queryResult =
            from qRes1 in queryValues1
            from qRes2 in queryValues2
            where qRes1 * qRes2 == 12
            select new { qRes1, qRes2 };

        foreach (var result in queryResult)
        {
            textBox1.Text += result.qRes1 + " * " + result.qRes2 + " = 12" + Environment.NewLine;
        }

Obviously this code will result in:

1 * 12 = 12
2 * 6 = 12
3 * 4 = 12
4 * 3 = 12
6 * 2 = 12

But what I need is only the first 3 lines. That is I do not want if 2*6 = 12 the query checks if 6*2 is also 12. Is there a way to filter this in the LINQ query or I have to do it in the foreach loop afterward?

My question just is a sample to show what I mean. so I want to know the way of doing such thing no matter what is the type of object being linqed to!

share|improve this question
    
Wouldn't you, in this case, simply only take 1-5 as qRes1 to check these? – Tom van der Woerdt Dec 18 '11 at 1:52
    
@Tom That would still give 3*4 and 4*3. Though you could make the cutoff Math.Sqrt(12) instead of 5. – Kevin Stricker Dec 18 '11 at 1:55
    
Well I want to know how generally this can be done, the code I gave just is a sample. how to skip when where works! Damn I dont know how to exactly point to what I mean :P :D – Saeid Yazdani Dec 18 '11 at 1:55
    
@mootinator Oops, that's what I meant. – Tom van der Woerdt Dec 18 '11 at 1:57
    
@Sean87 Why don't you give a sample of how would you do it if there would exist this continue keyword? I think this would give us a better idea of what you are looking for. – Juan Dec 18 '11 at 2:09
up vote 0 down vote accepted

TakeWhile(condition):Returns elements from a sequence as long as a specified condition is true, and then skips the remaining elements.

foreach (var result in queryResult.TakeWhile(x => x.qRes1 <= Math.Sqrt(12)))
share|improve this answer
    
This is equivalent to break;, not continue;. But will answer for the particular case from the OP. – sq33G Dec 18 '11 at 10:16
    
@sq33G ,"or skip a itteration" So I think OK. In question rather than "continue" to think of a funny expression. – BLUEPIXY Dec 18 '11 at 10:27

In general the simple solution would be more where conditions since the where clauses are what by definition cause LINQ to skip iterations:

var queryResult =
    from qRes1 in queryValues1
    from qRes2 in queryValues1
    where qRes1 * qRes2 == 12
    && qRes1 <= Math.Sqrt(12)
    select new { qRes1, qRes2 };
share|improve this answer
    
there is no keyword or something that do this? so I have to think for and do it manually in case of any object or type the linq working on? – Saeid Yazdani Dec 18 '11 at 2:00
    
I'm having trouble understanding how you would expect to skip iterations without specifying what condition to skip iterations on. It does sound like you're looking for a condition which acts upon the result of past iterations, which is nothing like a continue. If that's what you want, I'd suggest clarifying the question. – Kevin Stricker Dec 18 '11 at 2:04
    
This answer ignores this sentence so I want to know the way of doing such thing no matter what is the type of object being linqed to! right? – Bastardo Dec 18 '11 at 2:04
    
@OkayGuy: given the context of this question which deals with integers i.e. numbers this solution works brilliantly. For different types, the conditions would have to be different too. If that answers your doubt – Amn Dec 18 '11 at 2:08
1  
@OkayGuy What type of action? In a normal foreach loop you say if (x) continue; In a LINQ query you would say where !x. – Kevin Stricker Dec 18 '11 at 2:12

You could use .Distinct() and create your own IEqualityComparer that compares objects based on what 'equals' means in your case.

So, for your original example:

class PairSetEqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<Tuple<int, int>>
    {
        public bool Equals(Tuple<int, int> x, Tuple<int, int> y)
        {
            return (x.Item1 == y.Item1 && x.Item2 == y.Item2) ||
                   (x.Item1 == y.Item2 && x.Item2 == y.Item1);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(Tuple<int, int> obj)
        {
            return obj.Item1*obj.Item2;
        }
    } 

And, you use it like this:

var queryResult =
            (from qRes1 in queryValues1
            from qRes2 in queryValues2
            where qRes1 * qRes2 == 12
            select new Tuple<int, int>(qRes1, qRes2)).Distinct(new PairSetEqualityComparer());
share|improve this answer

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