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I'm working with an MS-SQL database with tables that use a customized date/time format stored as an integer. The format maintains time order, but is not one-to-one with ticks. Simple conversions are possible from the custom format to hours / days / months / etc. - for example, I could derive the month with the SQL statement:

SELECT ((CustomDateInt / 60 / 60 / 24) % 13) AS Month FROM HistoryData

From these tables, I need to generate reports, and I'd like to do this using LINQ-to-SQL. I'd like to have the ability to choose from a variety of grouping methods based on these dates (by month / by year / etc.).

I'd prefer to use the group command in LINQ that targets one of these grouping methods. For performance, I would like the grouping to be performed in the database, rather than pulling all my data into POCO objects first and then custom-grouping them afterwords. For example:

var results = from row in myHistoryDataContext.HistoryData
              group row by CustomDate.GetMonth(row.CustomDateInt) into grouping
              select new int?[] { grouping.Key , grouping.Count() }

How do I implement my grouping functions (like CustomDate.GetMonth) so that they will be transformed into SQL commands automatically and performed in the database? Do I need to provide them as Func<int, int> objects or Expression<> objects, or by some other means?

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So, just to be clear, this does work as inline code, eg: ((row.CustomDateInt /60 ) % 13) (works in linqpad) but not as a function (didn't try)? Fascinating. –  Kevin Stricker Dec 18 '11 at 3:48
    
@mootinator: I ran into mysterious ERR_CONNECTION_RESET issues from the WCF service I implemented this in when I was returning the results directly, and an equally cryptic error when returning its .ToList() variant. I think WCF waits as long as possible to generate and run the SQL statement, and doesn't detect that part of the Expression tree of mine is "un-SQL-izable" until it's too late. (I'm still trying to grok everything). –  J Bryan Price Dec 19 '11 at 20:06
    
Why not create views where the columns are cast as "normal" datetimes, and point LINQ to that? –  SteveCav Dec 20 '11 at 4:58
    
@SteveCav: My main concern is that transforming to a datetime requires divide-then-modulus for each date part, then reconstructing a datetime from there. A custom SQL function for this (which we have) would need to run on every row in any query needing date access. Since I'm looking to group by date parts, and can derive a formula for this, it seems like a custom function would slow things down. Am I over-thinking this? –  J Bryan Price Dec 21 '11 at 18:45
    
@mootinator: And yes, it does work inline, but not as a passed-in function call. I checked. –  J Bryan Price Dec 21 '11 at 18:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

You can't write a method and expect L2S to automatically know how to take your method and translate it to SQL. L2S knows about some of the more common methods provided as part of the .NET framework for primitive types. Anything beyond that and it will not know how to perform the translation.

If you have to keep your db model as is:

You can define methods for interacting with the custom format and use them in queries. However, you'll have to help L2S with the translation. To do this, you would look for calls to your methods in the expression tree generated for your query and replace them with an implementation L2S can translate. One way to do this is to provide a proxy IQueryProvider implementation that inspects the expression tree for a given query and performs the replacement before passing it off to the L2S IQueryProvider for translation and execution. The expression tree L2S will see can be translated to SQL because it only contains the simple arithmetic operations used in the definitions of your methods.

If you have the option to change your db model:

You might be better off using a standard DateTime column type for your data. Then your could model the column as System.DateTime and use its methods (which L2S understands). You could achieve this by modifying the table itself or providing a view that performs the conversion and having L2S interact with the view.

Update: Since you need to keep your current model, you'll want to translate your methods for L2S. Our objective is to replace calls to some specific methods in a L2S query with a lambda L2S can translate. All other calls to these methods will of course execute normally. Here's an example of one way you could do that...

static class DateUtils
{
    public static readonly Expression<Func<int, int>> GetMonthExpression = t => (t / 60 / 60 / 24) % 13;
    static readonly Func<int, int> GetMonthFunction;

    static DateUtils()
    {
        GetMonthFunction = GetMonthExpression.Compile();
    }

    public static int GetMonth(int t)
    {
        return GetMonthFunction(t);
    }
}

Here we have a class that defines a lambda expression for getting the month from an integer time. To avoid defining the math twice, you could compile the expression and then invoke it from your GetMonth method as shown here. Alternatively, you could take the body of the lambda and copy it into the body of the GetMonth method. That would skip the runtime compilation of the expression and likely execute faster -- up to you which you prefer.

Notice that the signature of the GetMonthExpression lambda matches the GetMonth method exactly. Next we'll inspect the query expression using System.Linq.Expressions.ExpressionVisitor, find calls to GetMonth, and replace them with our lambda, having substituted t with the value of the first argument to GetMonth.

class DateUtilMethodCallExpander : ExpressionVisitor
{
    protected override Expression VisitMethodCall(MethodCallExpression node)
    {
        LambdaExpression Substitution = null;

        //check if the method call is one we should replace
        if(node.Method.DeclaringType == typeof(DateUtils))
        {
            switch(node.Method.Name)
            {
                case "GetMonth": Substitution = DateUtils.GetMonthExpression;
            }
        }

        if(Substitution != null)
        {
            //we'd like to replace the method call; we'll need to wire up the method call arguments to the parameters of the lambda
            var Replacement = new LambdaParameterSubstitution(Substitution.Parameters, node.Arguments).Visit(Substitution.Body);
            return Replacement;
        }

        return base.VisitMethodCall(node);
    }
}

class LambdaParameterSubstitution : ExpressionVisitor
{
    ParameterExpression[] Parameters;
    Expression[] Replacements;

    public LambdaParameterExpressionVisitor(ParameterExpression[] parameters, Expression[] replacements)
    {
        Parameters = parameters;
        Replacements = replacements;
    }

    protected override Expression VisitParameter(ParameterExpression node)
    {
        //see if the parameter is one we should replace
        int p = Array.IndexOf(Parameters, node);
        if(p >= 0)
        {
            return Replacements[p];
        }

        return base.VisitParameter(node);
    }
}

The first class here will visit the query expression tree and find references to GetMonth (or any other method requiring substitution) and replace the method call. The replacement is provided in part by the second class, which inspects a given lambda expression and replaces references to its parameters.

Having transformed the query expression, L2S will never see calls to your methods, and it can now execute the query as expected.

In order to intercept the query before it hits L2S in a convenient way, you can create your own IQueryable provider that is used as a proxy in front of L2S. You would perform the above replacements in your implementation of Execute and then pass the new query expression to the L2S provider.

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I would love to change the db model, but that's not an option for me. When you say "performs the replacement", you mean "provide an Expression tree in place of the method call", right? Is there a way to simply transform my method call into an Expression tree at the point I include it in my LINQ statement? Or, even better, provide my method as an Expression tree? –  J Bryan Price Dec 21 '11 at 18:52
    
@JBryanPrice: I've tried to provide more details as to how you would go about replacing your method calls with L2S compatible expressions. –  Michael Petito Dec 22 '11 at 16:33
    
Although this won't be the method I will use in this case, it is the best answer to my question. Thank you for the detailed explanation; it helps me understand what's going on under the hood in L2S much better. –  J Bryan Price Dec 28 '11 at 18:40

I think you can register your custom function in the DataContext and use it in the linq query. In this post is very well explained: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb399416.aspx

Hope it helps.

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I like this idea - maybe adding a few SQL-side UDF's is the simplest approach to my situation. It would "paint the pig", so-to-speak, by letting custom database field formats be what they will, but providing an interface to the rest of the 'standard' world outside :) –  J Bryan Price Dec 27 '11 at 21:32
    
... but I'm still trying to understand and apply LINQ Expressions in this question ... –  J Bryan Price Dec 27 '11 at 21:33
    
Create a sql server function that executes the ((CustomDateInt / 60 / 60 / 24) % 13) calculation and map it to your datacontext –  ivowiblo Dec 27 '11 at 23:32

Found a reference to some existing code which implements an IQueryable provider as Michael suggests.

http://tomasp.net/blog/linq-expand.aspx

I think assuming that code works, the other lingering issue is that you would have to have an Expression property for each type which contained the date.

The resulting code for avoiding doing that appears to be a bit cumbersome (though it would avoid the sort of errors you're trying to avoid by putting the calculation in a method):

Group Expression:

group row by CustomDate.GetMonth(row, x => x.customdate).Compile().Invoke(row)

Method to Return Group Expression:

public class CustomDate
{
        public static Expression<Func<TEntity, int>> GetMonth<TEntity>(TEntity entity, Func<TEntity, int> func)
        {
            return x => ((func.Invoke(entity)/60/60/24)%13);
        }
}

I'm not entirely sure whether that nested .Invoke would cause problems with the Expandable expression or whether the concept would have to be tweaked a bit more, but that code seems to supply an alternative to building a custom IQueryProvider for simple mathematical expressions.

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Thanks for finding this reference! Along with Michael's answer, it really helped clarify how my LINQ statements are compiled and how they are subsequently transformed into SQL statements. I still feel like I'm missing the final "and this Expression becomes this SQL string using <xxx>", but I'll keep studying :) –  J Bryan Price Dec 28 '11 at 18:43

There doesn't appear to be any way to instruct LINQ-to-SQL to call your SQL UDF. However, I believe you can encapsulate a reusable C# implementation in System.Linq.Expressions.Expression trees...

public class CustomDate {
    public static readonly Expression<Func<int, int>> GetMonth = 
                customDateInt => (customDateInt / 60 / 60 / 24) % 13;
}

var results = from row in myHistoryDataContext.HistoryData
              group row by CustomDate.GetMonth(row.CustomDateInt) into grouping
              select new int?[] { grouping.Key , grouping.Count() }
share|improve this answer
    
This was my first attempt at this, actually. The problem I had with it was that results is a deferred query expression that simply contains a reference to CustomDate.GetMonth and leaves it at that, rather than pulling the Expression it represents into the query tree directly when my code is compiled. The deferred SQL generation is thus roadblocked by the (effectively opaque) reference. I think that's why Michael is pointing me towards replacement-at-the-point-of-query-generation methods. –  J Bryan Price Dec 27 '11 at 20:43

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