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Have a query to set records as bad by comparing with another table. To save time, I exclude records that have already been marked as 'bad'.

I wrote a query, but accidentally checked for != 'b' instead of != 'B'... the query executed in 0.203 seconds. When I realized my mistake, I changed it to != 'B', but now the query takes more than 200 seconds to execute!!!

When I checked the plans, the optimizer for 'b' chooses a concatenation of two hash joins. The plan for 'B' chooses nested loops.

If it matters, there aren't any records marked as 'B' for my test. There are ~18,000 records in gsu.stg_userdata, and ~ 73,000 records in gsu.userdata_compare. Both queries come up with the same (and correct) number of results.


The query:

select gstgu.global_id
from   gsu.stg_userdata gstgu
  left join gsu.userdata_compare guc
    on (gstgu.global_id = guc.global_id) or (gstgu.user_id = guc.user_id)
where  gstgu.row_check != 'b' 
   and ((-- Global IDs match, but two different Network IDs are explicitly set
         (gstgu.global_id = guc.global_id) and (guc.user_id is not null and 
                                                gstgu.user_id is not null and
                                                guc.user_id != gstgu.user_id))
         -- Network IDs match, but two different Global IDs are explicitly set
      or (guc.user_id = gstgu.user_id and (guc.global_id is not null and 
                                           gstgu.global_id is not null and
                                           guc.global_id != gstgu.global_id))
      or length(gstgu.global_id) != 8)
   and guc.global_id != '00000000';

--


The plan for this sql:

                                                 Cost   Card   Bytes
SELECT STATEMENT, GOAL = ALL_ROWS                1014   1410   49350
 CONCATENATION          
  HASH JOIN                                       507    559   19565
   TABLE ACCESS FULL       GSU  STG_USERDATA      205  11144  189448
   INDEX FAST FULL SCAN    GSU  USERCOMPARE_IDX   302  16979  305622
  HASH JOIN                                       507    851   29785
   INDEX FAST FULL SCAN    GSU  USERCOMPARE_IDX   302  16979  305622
   TABLE ACCESS FULL       GSU  STG_USERDATA      205  17949  305133


If I take the exact same query, and say

where  gstgu.row_check != 'B' 

it takes more than 200 seconds to execute (nearly 1,000x as long) and the plan looks like:

                                                 Cost   Card   Bytes
SELECT STATEMENT, GOAL = ALL_ROWS                 507      1      35
 NESTED LOOPS                                     507      1      35
  TABLE ACCESS FULL        GSU  STG_USERDATA      205      1      17
  INDEX FAST FULL SCAN     GSU  USERCOMPARE_IDX   302      1      18


I'm going crazy, what gives??

.

share|improve this question
    
Are there any rows that match = 'b'? Do you have any kind of statistics on that column? –  Mat Dec 18 '11 at 8:09
    
None of the rows match 'b', either... they're all 'N'. I'll have to look at statistics... they're tables in dev only right now, we don't usually worry about stats until a table's in prod. But I can't think of a reason why that would matter, given the fact that neither 'b' nor 'B' are in the table. –  James King Dec 18 '11 at 8:28
3  
Stale histograms that "mention" either B or b could have strange effects like what you are seeing. –  Mat Dec 18 '11 at 8:31
    
Can you give the columns of the involved tables? –  fge Dec 18 '11 at 10:03
    
The best would be to make use of a trace to verify exactly what the optimizer is doing - will save you time in guessing what could possibly be happening - Question: has the value 'b' ever existed at some point in time in the column? –  davidsr Dec 19 '11 at 13:50
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1 Answer

add an index to Row_check field .... most of the times this issue is caused by this.

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