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What I want to do is something like this:

switch( myObject.GetType().GetProperty( "id") )
{
    case ??: 
        // when Nullable<Int32>, do this
    case ??:
        // when string, do this
    case ??:
        // when Nullable<bool>, do this

What path under object.GetType() would have the string name of the datatype that I could compare using a case statement? I need to know the type so I can have one of many Convert.ToInt32( string ) that will set the value of myObject using Reflection.

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1  
This is almost definitely doing things wrong. Why can't you take advantage of polymorphism, rather than using a giant switch statement? –  Cody Gray Dec 18 '11 at 6:33
    
If you're suggesting to create several functions with different parameter types, I could. In this case, I am copying a set of properties of different types from one object to another where one is always a string type. So, I need to convert the value to assign it. That and I have very little experience with Reflection. –  Dr. Zim Dec 18 '11 at 6:40
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't need a string name to compare it:

if (myObject.GetType() == typeof(Nullable<Int32>))
    // when Nullable<Int32>, do this
else if (myObject.GetType() == typeof(string))
    // when string, do this
else if (myObject.GetType() == typeof(Nullable<bool>))
    // when Nullable<bool>, do this

Edit: Changed switch statement to if chain.

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Are you sure you compare .GetType() to typeof( Nullable<Int32>) or is it a property under GetType()? Assuming int? and Nullable<Int32> are the same type, a.GetType() != typeof( Nullable<Int32>). –  Dr. Zim Dec 18 '11 at 6:35
    
You probably have to do this with if statements, rather than in a switch statement. But, like you, I've never done this before. It looks like an anti-pattern to me. –  Cody Gray Dec 18 '11 at 6:36
    
VS studio will have panic attack over the above code switch(myObject.GetType()) will show an IDE error of "Value of integral type expected" and case typeof(XXX) will show an IDE error of "Constant Value is expected" –  heads5150 Dec 18 '11 at 6:37
    
There changed the switch to an if chain. –  M.Babcock Dec 18 '11 at 6:48
3  
He worked on myObject.GetType().GetProperty("ID").PropertyType. The static type of the property can be Nullable<T>, it's just GetType() that can't return a nullable. –  CodesInChaos Dec 19 '11 at 22:16
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The question is very confusing. Is "myObject" the object that might be a nullable int? Or is the property "id" possibly of type nullable int?

If the former, your question cannot be answered because it presupposes a falsehood. There is no such thing as a boxed nullable int. I note that all of the answers which propose if (myobject.GetType() == typeof(int?)) are therefore incorrect; the condition will never be true.

When you convert a nullable int to object, either it becomes a null reference (if the nullable int had no value) or it becomes a boxed int. There is no way to determine if an object contains a nullable int because an object never contains a nullable int.

If the latter, compare the property type to typeof(int?). You cannot use a switch; only constants may be used for switch cases and types are not constants.

All that said, this is a bad code smell. Why are you using reflection in the first place?

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I've been using the following type of code to check if the type is nullable and to get the actual type:

if (type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
{
    return Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type);
}

If the type is e.g. Nullable this code returns the int part (underlying type). If you just need to convert object into specific type you could use System.Convert.ChangeType method.

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If you really must, you could do it this way.

if (myObject is Nullable<int>)
    Console.WriteLine("Nullable<int>");
else if (myObject is string)
    Console.WriteLine("string");
else if (myObject is Nullable<bool>)
    Console.WriteLine("Nullable<bool>");
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As @Cody Gray said if statements would probably be the best way

var t = myObject.GetType();

if (t == typeof(Nullable<int>))
{ }
else if (t == typeof(string))
{}
else if (t==typeof(Nullable<bool>))
{}
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1  
interestingly enough, when int? a = 3 then typeof( a) is "System.Int32" –  Dr. Zim Dec 18 '11 at 6:48
1  
@Dr.Zim: See explanation here: stackoverflow.com/questions/785358/… –  Rick Sladkey Dec 18 '11 at 7:01
1  
@Dr.Zim typeof(a) doesn't even compile. It's a.GetType() that returns int. –  CodesInChaos Dec 19 '11 at 21:56
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In .net, instances of value types are just collections of bits, with no associated type information. For every value type other than Nullable<T>, however, the system also auto-generates a corresponding class type which derives from System.ValueType. A widening conversion exists from the value type to the auto-generated class type, and a narrowing conversion from the auto-generated class type to the value type. In the case of Nullable<T>, there is no corresponding auto-generated class type with conversions to/from the value type; instead, widening conversions exist in both directions between Nullable<T> and the class type associated with T.

As far as I can tell, this weird behavior was implemented to allow comparisons between null and an empty Nullable<T> to return true.

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