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I use entity framework migration (in Automatic migration mode). Everything is Ok, but I have one question: How should I seed data when I have many to many relation. For example I have two model classes:

public class Parcel
{
  public int Id { get; set; }
  public string Description { get; set; }
  public double Weight { get; set; }
  public virtual ICollection<BuyingItem> Items { get; set; }
}

public class BuyingItem
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public decimal Price { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Parcel> Parcels { get; set; }
}

I understand how to seed simple data (for PaymentSystem class) and one-to-many relations, but what code should I write in Seed method to generate some instances of Parcel and BuyingItem? I mean using DbContext.AddOrUpdate(), because I don't want to duplicate data every time I run Update-Database.

protected override void Seed(ParcelDbContext context)
{
        context.AddOrUpdate(ps => ps.Id,
                            new PaymentSystem {Id = 1, Name = "Visa"},
                            new PaymentSystem {Id = 2, Name = "PayPal"},
                            new PaymentSystem {Id = 3, Name = "Cash"});
}

protected override void Seed(Context context)
{
    base.Seed(context);

    // This will create Parcel, BuyingItems and relations only once
    context.AddOrUpdate(new Parcel() 
    { 
        Id = 1, 
        Description = "Test", 
        Items = new List<BuyingItem>
        {
            new BuyingItem() { Id = 1, Price = 10M },
            new BuyingItem() { Id = 2, Price = 20M }
        }
    });

    context.SaveChanges();
}

Yes. This code create Parcel, BuyingItems and relation, but if I need the same BuyingItem in other Parcel (they have many-to-many relation) and if I repeat this code for the second parcel - it will duplicate BuyingItems in database (though I set the same Id's). Example:

protected override void Seed(Context context)
{
    base.Seed(context);

    context.AddOrUpdate(new Parcel() 
    { 
        Id = 1, 
        Description = "Test", 
        Items = new List<BuyingItem>
        {
            new BuyingItem() { Id = 1, Price = 10M },
            new BuyingItem() { Id = 2, Price = 20M }
        }
    });

    context.AddOrUpdate(new Parcel() 
    { 
        Id = 2, 
        Description = "Test2", 
        Items = new List<BuyingItem>
        {
            new BuyingItem() { Id = 1, Price = 10M },
            new BuyingItem() { Id = 2, Price = 20M }
        }
    });

    context.SaveChanges();
}

How can I add same BuyingItems in different Parcels?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You must fill many-to-many relation in the same way as you build many-to-many relation in any EF code:

protected override void Seed(Context context)
{
    base.Seed(context);

    // This will create Parcel, BuyingItems and relations only once
    context.AddOrUpdate(new Parcel() 
    { 
        Id = 1, 
        Description = "Test", 
        Items = new List<BuyingItem>
        {
            new BuyingItem() { Id = 1, Price = 10M },
            new BuyingItem() { Id = 2, Price = 20M }
        }
    });

    context.SaveChanges();
}

Specifying Id which will be used in database is crucial otherwise each Update-Database will create new records.

AddOrUpdate doesn't support changing relations in any way so you cannot use it to add or remove relations in next migration. If you need it you must manually remove relation by loading Parcel with BuyingItems and calling Remove or Add on navigation collection to break or add new relation.

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Is it still valid that AddOrUpdate doesn't support changing relations in EF Migrations final release? It would explain the problem in this question stackoverflow.com/q/10474839/270591, wouldn't it? –  Slauma May 7 '12 at 18:27
4  
This doesn't seem to work as expected if BuyingItem.Id is an identity column. In that case, when the item does not exist, it is inserted with an ID generated by the DB instead of the ID you specified. This means AddOrUpdate with hard coded IDs are not a viable solution for seeding, because it will generated duplicates on the next seed run. Tested on EF5. –  anjdreas Jan 6 '13 at 15:36
    
Ladislav, I'm not seeing this work with the Parcel.Items.Add() method on the related entity relationship as you suggested when the root entity and the related entity exist already in the DB (in short, when we're trying to simply update the relationship solely). When calling Parcel.Items.Add(new BuyingItem() { Id = 1, Price = 10M }), the item is not added as would be expected after calling context.SaveChanges(). –  Ryan Griffith Jun 28 '14 at 0:59
    
As I suppose the Id is identity column and will be generated in dbms. In this case you can't set it to value you want. So there is no way to be sure that there will be no duplicates when EF will run seeding again, because you don't have control over Ids. For example you have 3 parcels (parcel1, parcel2, parcel3) and you removed parcel2 from seeding. You will have duplicated parcel3 if you will decide to create your db again or run your app on other instance. The problem arise when Ids used in seeding code become out of sync with Ids in db. –  vk5880 Aug 13 '14 at 16:40

Ok. I understand how I should be in that situation:

protected override void Seed(Context context)
{
    base.Seed(context);
    var buyingItems = new[]
    {
        new BuyingItem
        {
             Id = 1,
             Price = 10m
        },
        new BuyingItem
        {
             Id = 2,
             Price = 20m,
        }
    }

    context.AddOrUpdate(new Parcel() 
    { 
        Id = 1, 
        Description = "Test", 
        Items = new List<BuyingItem>
        {
            buyingItems[0],
            buyingItems[1]
        }
    },
    new Parcel() 
    { 
        Id = 2, 
        Description = "Test2", 
        Items = new List<BuyingItem>
        {
            buyingItems[0],
            buyingItems[1]
        }
    });

    context.SaveChanges();
}

There are no duplicates in database.

Thank you, Ladislav, you gave me a right vector to find a solution for my task.

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I would like to add a few observations here:

  1. Using Id is probably not going to do any good if the Id column is a database generated field. EF is going to ignore it.

  2. This method seems to be working fine when the Seed method is run once. It won't create any duplicates, however, if you run it for second time (and most of us have to do that often), it may inject duplicated. In my case it did.

This tutorial by Tom Dykstra showed me the right way of doing it. It works because we don't take anything for granted. We don't specify IDs. Instead, we query the context by known unique keys and add related entities (which again are acquired by querying context) to them. It worked like a charm in my case.

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I used the method in the tutorial mentioned above and it worked. –  tekiegirl Oct 29 '14 at 13:12

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