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I have a field on my table which represents seconds, I want to convert to minutes

Select (100/60) as Minute from MyTable
-> 1.66

How can I get 1 minute and 40 seconds 00:01:40 and then round to 00:02:00 and if 00:01:23 round to 00:01:30

Using Mysql.

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Are you trying to round to the nearest 30 seconds and display as mm:ss? –  MatBailie Dec 18 '11 at 10:58
    
Yes, i am trying to round to the nearest 30 seconds and display as mm:ss –  hch Dec 18 '11 at 11:16

4 Answers 4

There are two ways of rounding, using integer arithmetic and avoiding floating points, a value to the nearest thirty seconds...

  • ((seconds + 15) DIV 30) * 30
  • (seconds + 15) - (seconds + 15) % 30

The latter is longer, but in terms of cpu time should be faster.


You can then use SEC_TO_TIME(seconds) to get the format hh:mm:ss, and take the right 5 characters if you really need hh:mm.


If you wanted to avoid SEC_TO_TIME(seconds), you can build up the string yourself.

  • minutes = total_seconds DIV 60
  • seconds = total_seconds % 60

  • final string = LPAD(minutes, 2, '0') | ':' | LPAD(seconds, 2, '0')

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I think you need to rework that first example with some parenthesis and either a FLOOR()ing or a DIVing... –  pilcrow Dec 18 '11 at 22:41
    
@pilcrow - Parenthesis, yup, my mistake. No need for FLOOR, etc though, but must ensure that all values are INTEGERS - It's provided as an example on how to achieve this with integer arithmetic as it's significantly less CPU intensive than floating point arithmetic. –  MatBailie Dec 18 '11 at 22:44
1  
Yes, you must ensure results are integral. :) Your first example gives the wrong value under MySQL if "seconds" is, say, 83. The / operator yields a DECIMAL even if both operands are integral. So, you must either FLOOR() the quotient, set @@div_precision_increment to zero (yuck!), or use DIV in place of /. –  pilcrow Dec 18 '11 at 23:12
    
Fixed now, great. –  pilcrow Dec 19 '11 at 0:12

i am not sure about how to round it but you can convert seconds into time i.e hh:mm:ss format using SEC_TO_TIME(totaltime)

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Desired result :

A = 30
B = 60
C = 90
D = 120

select 

(25 + 15)-(25 + 15) % 30 as A,

(32 + 15)-(32 + 15) % 30 as B,

(90 + 15)-(90 + 15) % 30 as C,

(100 + 15)-(100 + 15) % 30 as D

Result :

A = 30

B = 30

C = 90

D = 90

I try with this:

select 

30* ceil(30/30) as A,

30* ceil(32/30) as B,

30* ceil(90/30) as C,

30* ceil(100/30) as D

Result :

A = 30

B = 60

C = 90

D = 120

Thank you for your help !

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Ceiling introduces floating point arithmetic, it's wasting cpu cycles at present. If you don't want to round to the nearest 30 seconds, but actually always round up, then I'd use this instead... (x + 29) - (x + 29) % 30 –  MatBailie Dec 18 '11 at 22:27

You can simply write your own function http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/create-procedure.html

But I'd rather do that in a programing language (PHP, Python, C), not on the database side.

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it is not an answer of asked question –  Haider Ali Wajihi Dec 27 '13 at 10:11

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