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Is there a way to declare a generic function that the generic type is of type1 or type2?

example:

public void Foo<T>(T number)
{
}

Can I constraint T to be int or long

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1  
    
@BoltClock, Because my code breaks when the parameter isn't one of the primitive(int, long, double...) and I want to get errors on compilation not on RunTime –  gdoron Dec 18 '11 at 15:56
    
Related: Generic method multiple(OR) type constraint –  JW Lim Jun 27 at 7:25
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use generic constraints to limit the type of each generic argument. Unfortunately there is no generic constraint that would allow you to enforce at compile time whether T is type1 or type2. There is no way to enforce at compile time that your generic argument can be of any primitive type (int, long, double, ...).

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No.

That doesn't make sense; T would not have any usable compile-time type in the method.

Instead, you should make two overloaded methods.

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I think it does make sense. I have a code that if you pass a parameter different then double, decimal, float, int, long etc' will brake. I want to verify this at compilation. Doesn't make sense? –  gdoron Dec 18 '11 at 15:59
    
@gdoron: From your point of view, it makes sense. From the compiler's point of view, it does not make sense, since T would not be a usable type. –  SLaks Dec 18 '11 at 16:02
    
In this case the compiler can treat T as the common of type1 and type2, where there is no relation T is object... –  gdoron Dec 18 '11 at 16:09
2  
I think this is a reasonable question, if you read between the lines. It seems he is asking for a constraint such as where T : number which unfortunately doesn't exist. Still, it would be a construct that makes sense... –  Max Dec 18 '11 at 16:28
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Create two methods:

public void Foo(int number)
{
} 

public void Foo(long number)
{
}

Older programming languages worked on the principle "There can be only one". c# allows you to have several methods with the same name in the same class, interface or struct. These methods must have a different signature. This means, that they must have a different number of parameters or parameters with different types (or both). This is called method overloading.

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I can't write 20 method for each numeric value type. this is what Generics should have solved –  gdoron Dec 18 '11 at 16:32
    
Artihmetic operations are not supported on generic type parameters. See System.Text.StringBuilder for an example. It defines more than 20 Append() overloads for differents types. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 18 '11 at 16:42
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I don't think this is currently possible.

This question about creating a math library sort of covers the same ground, and includes some work arounds.

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