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Can we write selectors by only name

For example,

<div name= "outer-name">
    <img name="inner-image" src="images/ine.jpg" alt"" />
</div>

I want to take style of inner-mage in css file like [outer-name] [inner-image]

In CSS file

[outer-name] [inner-image] {
    /*styles*/
}

I cant take selector as [outer-name] img etc .. only selecting by name

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use attribute selectors:

[name="outer-name"] [name="inner-image"]

But keep in mind that name is not a valid attribute for <div> or <img>, even though the above selector will work. It's best that you either change them to classes, or if you're using HTML5, add the data- prefix to them, so it looks like this:

<div data-name= "outer-name">
    <img data-name="inner-image" src="images/ine.jpg" alt"" />
</div>

Then use this selector:

[data-name="outer-name"] [data-name="inner-image"]
share|improve this answer
    
Here's an example: jsfiddle.net/sde6t –  FakeRainBrigand Dec 18 '11 at 16:14
2  
is there anything you don't know about css boltclock? ;) –  marflar Dec 18 '11 at 16:20
4  
@stephenmurdoch: BoltClock knows how to implement CSS6 parent-selector notation, but isn't telling us, because no browser can yet keep up with him. –  David Thomas Dec 18 '11 at 16:25
    
It is not possible to give as class due to some reasons. Then tried with id to style ,but I have heard about 'id collision' in different pages(don't have enough idea).That is why ,I stick to name attribute –  Justin John Dec 18 '11 at 16:29
    
I can't think of any good reason that you can include arbitrary attributes yet not classes. Use HTML5 data-* attributes, maybe? Then it'll validate, plus you can be confident that modern browsers will play well with it. –  BoltClock Dec 18 '11 at 16:30

Given the following html:

<div data-name="something">
    <p>Content in 'something'</p>
    <span data-someAttribute="someAttribute">Content in 'someAttribute' div.</span>
</div>

And the CSS:

[data-name] {
    background-color: red;
}

[data-name] [data-someAttribute] {
    display: block;
    background-color: #ffa;
}

This is perfectly valid (or, at least, it's implemented in Chromium 14/Ubuntu 11.04). I've changed from using name attributes (since they're invalid for div elements, or other non-form elements), and used, instead, data-* prefixed custom attributes, which are valid in HTML5 and, while perhaps not 'valid' in HTML 4, they seem to be understood by those browsers still.

JS Fiddle demo.

It's worth noting that you can also use attribute=equals notation, to select only certain elements based on the value of their data-* attributes:

<div data-name="something">
    <p>Content in data-name='something' element.</p>
    <span data-someAttribute="someAttribute">Content in 'someAttribute' div.</span>
</div>

And the CSS:

[data-name] {
    background-color: red;
}

[data-name="something"] {
    font-weight: bold;
}

[data-name] [data-someAttribute] {
    background-color: #ffa;
    text-decoration: underline;
    font-weight: normal;
}

JS Fiddle demo.

Also, if CSS3 is an option for you, it's possible to use attribute-begins-with (^=) notation:

[data-name] {
    background-color: red;
}

[data-name^="s"] {
    font-weight: bold;
}

[data-name] [data-someAttribute] {
    background-color: #ffa;
    text-decoration: underline;
    font-weight: normal;
}

JS Fiddle demo.

And attribute-ends-with ($=) notation:

[data-name] {
    background-color: red;
}

[data-name$="ing"] {
    font-weight: bold;
}

[data-name] [data-someAttribute] {
    background-color: #ffa;
    text-decoration: underline;
    font-weight: normal;
}

References:

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the references. If you add the [data-name="something"] to your examples, I can remove my answer. –  FakeRainBrigand Dec 18 '11 at 16:55

As @Bolt said, name isn't valid there (yet it still works on my browser). You can use the HTML5 data- properties. Here's a fiddle showing how it's done.

The real solution here would be to use classes, but I assume you have a reason for not using them.

share|improve this answer
    
Browsers are pretty lenient, and the CSS spec doesn't enforce the same attribute restrictions that HTML does, which could explain why it works :) –  BoltClock Dec 18 '11 at 16:20

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