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I was wondering what the best way to format a string would be in Scala. I'm reimplementing the toString method for a class, and it's a rather long and complex string. I thought about using String.format but it seems to have problems with Scala. Is there a native Scala function for doing this?

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up vote 14 down vote accepted

I was simply using it wrong. Correct usage is .format(parem1, parem2).

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There is a thing in RichString which lets you do some nicer stuff here, though; whereas just using the Java API you do: String.format( "%s has %d bunnies", name, bunnyCount ) You can do the following: "%s has %d bunnies".format( name, bunnyCount ) Or even use it as an operator: "%s has %d bunnies" format ( name, bunnyCount ) –  Calum May 15 '09 at 14:13
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That's how I'm using it. –  Rayne May 16 '09 at 1:35
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The thing to watch out for with String#format is the fact that it is actually implemented using reflection (as of v2.7.4). It delegates to the Java API, but the reflection adds a pretty significant overhead to a comparatively minor method call. You may want to consider Java-style string concatenation, just for performance reasons. As I understand it, Scala version 2.8.0 should resolve this problem.

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The once comically overcomplicated format is now only: def format(args : Any*) : String = java.lang.String.format(self, args.toArray[Any].asInstanceOf[Array[AnyRef]]: _*) –  extempore May 14 '09 at 21:02
    
Looking at the source of 2.9.1 this is fixed. StringLike.format(args: *Any) now simply wraps java.lang.String.format. –  mtsz Feb 4 '12 at 23:33
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How about good old java.text.MessageFormat?

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