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When and why to 'return false' in javascript?

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That's kind of a vague question... Could you please be a little more specific? –  Sasha Chedygov May 12 '09 at 23:16
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Based on the answers so far, I think it would be nifty if a search on (return false JavaScript) were to return this page. –  Thomas L Holaday May 13 '09 at 1:24
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I arrived here after searching "return false JavaScript" in SO's search bar. And the third answer was helpful to me. –  Eric Wilson Mar 26 '10 at 16:27

9 Answers 9

up vote 41 down vote accepted

Often, in event handlers, such as onsubmit, returning false is a way to tell the event to not actually fire. So, say, in the onsubmit case, this would mean that the form is not submitted.

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This is particularly good if you want an AJAX form that submits without reloading the page - but also works by submitting and reloading the page when javascript is not available. –  Dean Rather May 13 '09 at 1:50
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Return false is actually overkill for preventing the default action when creating event handlers and can lead to fragile code. Explanation and examples at Douglas Neiner's post here fuelyourcoding.com/jquery-events-stop-misusing-return-false –  Marquis Wang Oct 11 '11 at 20:46
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With jQuery, its better to use event.preventDefault() for this functionality. I believe returning false is deprecated and doesn't always work anymore. –  onetwopunch Mar 24 at 21:32
    
Sometimes the return false is in the method, does this changes anything ? –  Francisco Corrales Morales Jun 27 at 16:10

I'm guessing that you're referring to the fact that you often have to put a 'return false;' statement in your event handlers, i.e.

<a href="#" onclick="doSomeFunction(); return false;">...

The 'return false;' in this case stops the browser from jumping to the current location, as indicated by the href="#" - instead, only doSomeFunction() is executed. It's useful for when you want to add events to anchor tags, but don't want the browser jumping up and down to each anchor on each click

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Of course, the 'href="#"' is bad practice, but your overall point still stands :-) –  Bobby Jack Jan 10 '12 at 21:20
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@vol7ron: the alternative is a real URL that acts as an alternative for those people without javascript. Otherwise, they'll just be clicking on a link with nothing happening. –  Bobby Jack Aug 22 '12 at 17:59
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@vol7ron: of course, it's down to each and every developer (or site owner) to determine exactly how much of the potential user base they want to cater for. In a case like this, however, where the option that targets more people is SO simple, I don't see why you wouldn't opt for it. Also, bear in mind that it's not just about people explicitly disabling javascript; it can be: someone else imposing that decision on them, a network problem downloading the JS file, a bug in one line of the JS causing it all to fail. Also, it's quite nice if right-click->open in new tab still works. –  Bobby Jack Aug 23 '12 at 15:26
    
@BobbyJack: valid points –  vol7ron Aug 23 '12 at 17:50
    
It's not less than 1% of users. Many people use extensions like NoScript for a reason. To turn things like javascript off purposefully. –  Sepero Nov 30 '12 at 16:34

Er ... how about in a boolean function to indicate 'not true'?

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aehaehu, fairly true, literally. –  José Leal May 12 '09 at 23:24
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what about FileNotFound? –  nickf May 12 '09 at 23:25
    
Even in FileNotFound false is still not true ain't it? –  Gleb May 12 '09 at 23:51
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Gleb: There's no "in FileNotFound", it's a TDWTF in-joke: thedailywtf.com/Articles/What_Is_Truth_0x3f_.aspx –  Chris Jester-Young May 13 '09 at 2:40

It is used to stop the propagation of the event. You see when you have two elements both with a click event handler (for example)

-----------------------------------
| element1                        |
|   -------------------------     |
|   |element2               |     |
|   -------------------------     |
|                                 |
-----------------------------------

If you click on the inner element (element2) it will trigger a click event in both elements: 1 and 2. It is called "Event bubbling". If you want to handle the event in element2 only, then the event handler has to return false to stop the event propagation.

Another example will be the link onclick handler. If you want to stop a link form working. You can add an onclick handler and return false. To stop the event from propagating to the default handler.

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the first part of this answer is wrong: returning false from an event handler will prevent the default action associated with an event; you could also do this via calling event.preventDefault() or setting event.returnValue = false (IE); in order to stop the event from bubbling, you'll have to call event.stopPropagation() or setting event.cancelBubble = true (IE) –  Christoph May 12 '09 at 23:55

When using jQuery's each function, returning true or false has meaning. See the doc

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I also came to this page after searching "js, when to use 'return false;' Among the other search results was a page I found far more useful and straightforward, on Chris Coyier's CSS-Tricks site: The difference between ‘return false;’ and ‘e.preventDefault();’

The gist of his article is:

function() { return false; }

// IS EQUAL TO

function(e) { e.preventDefault(); e.stopPropagation(); }

though I would still recommend reading the whole article.

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I think a better question is, why in a case where you're evaluating a boolean set of return values, would you NOT use true/false? I mean, you could probably have true/null, true/-1, other misc. Javascript "falsy" values to substitute, but why would you do that?

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When you want to trigger javascript code from an anchor tag, the onclick handler should be used rather than the javascript: pseudo-protocol. The javascript code that runs within the onclick handler must return true or false (or an expression than evalues to true or false) back to the tag itself - if it returns true, then the HREF of the anchor will be followed like a normal link. If it returns false, then the HREF will be ignored. This is why "return false;" is often included at the end of the code within an onclick handler.

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http://jqueryfordesigners.com/jquery-tabs/ This will give you a good, easy example. Watch the screencast or check out the demo code.

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