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While trying to understand how refp's solution for random hash value selection works, I noticed something strange.

With repeated calls to the following Perl script, I consistently found that the first result returned was the same. The subsequent values returned were random:

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

my %hash = map { $_ => ord $_ } 'a' .. 'z';

say( (@_=%hash)[1|rand@_] ) for 1 .. 10;       # First value always 119

Interestingly, the following does not suffer from this issue:

sub random_value { ( @_ )[ 1 | rand @_ ] }

say random_value %hash for 1 .. 10;            # First value is random

Removing the references to @_ also remedies the problem:

say( (%hash)[1|rand keys %hash] ) for 1 .. 10; # First value is random

This has been tested on Windows (ActivePerl 5.14.2).

On the surface, it looks like setting @_ has something to do with it, but I'm not sure. Can anyone shed some light on what's happening here?


EDIT

I thought this question was answered until refp provided an update. Why does the arrayref form not suffer from the same issue discussed above? :

[@_=%hash]->[1|rand@_] for 1 .. 10;            # First value is random
share|improve this question
    
You do not seed your PRNG. –  fge Dec 18 '11 at 19:07
    
If you want a different sequence each run, you need to seed it first, srand instruction in perl I think. –  Tony Hopkinson Dec 18 '11 at 19:18
    
Why do I need to srand it? I want to produce a random sequence every time and the script outlined in the question is always producing the same first value (119). I want to know why the first value is always the same across multiple calls to the script –  Zaid Dec 18 '11 at 19:21
3  
You do not need to use srand, unless you use a perl version lower than 5.004. See perldoc -f rand : Automatically calls srand unless srand has already been called –  TLP Dec 18 '11 at 19:39
    
@TLP : Thanks for the clarification. –  Zaid Dec 18 '11 at 19:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I suspect there is a race condition where @_ is not defined in the first loop iteration.

say( (@_=%hash)[1|rand@_] ) for 1 .. 10; 

Will become

say( (@_=%hash)[1|rand ()] ) for 1 .. 10; 

It escapes warnings because @_ is a predeclared variable. As you will notice:

say( (my @a=%hash)[1|rand@a] ) for 1 .. 10;   

Will crash and burn because @a is not defined in the postscript.

Update:

[@_=%hash]->[1|rand@_] for 1 .. 10;    

Is not any different. It is still bad practice to use a variable in the same statement that you assign it. The difference, I am guessing, is that the precedence is somewhat altered, so that the assignment is evaluated first.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 : You've hit the nail on the head! –  Zaid Dec 18 '11 at 20:02
    
@Zaid For a moment there, I thought you had poked a hole in it, since you removed your comment and vote. =P –  TLP Dec 18 '11 at 20:03
    
This is the solution. Calling rand() without arguments will return a value between 0 and 1. Combining it with the bitwise or is guaranteed to return 1, which corresponds to ( values %hash )[0]. It also explains why the other solutions don't suffer from the same symptoms. –  Zaid Dec 18 '11 at 20:06
    
I thought there was a hole because I was expecting $hash{a} to be returned as a result of 1|rand(), until I remembered that hashes don't preserve order :) –  Zaid Dec 18 '11 at 20:07
    
@Zaid I was actually surprised to see that I got the same first value as you, 119. I don't know how hashes are stored or retrieved, but it seems to be consistent. –  TLP Dec 18 '11 at 20:12

No race condition, or anything to do with whether @_ is "defined" or not, just an order of operations issue.

The indexes for a list slice are evaluated before the list being sliced. (The documentation doesn't guarantee this one way or the other.) So on the first iteration, @_ is empty and the argument to rand is 1|0 (= 0). Historically, rand(0) has behaved like rand(1), though this is now documented as subject to change. So the index on the first iteration is >= 0 and < 1, and taken to be 0 by the implicit int of indexing.

The array element fetch ([@_=%hash]->[1|rand@_]) doesn't suffer a similar problem because it evaluates the index after the array operand. An array slice (@{[@_=%hash]}[1|rand@_]), on the other hand, behaves as the list slice does.

Compare:

List slice:

$ perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e'(@_=%hash)[1|rand@_]'
1  <0> enter 
2  <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{
3  <0> pushmark s
4  <$> const[IV 1] s
5  <#> gv[*_] s
6  <1> rv2av[t7] sK/1
7  <1> rand[t8] sK/1
8  <2> bit_or[t9] sK
9  <0> pushmark s
a  <0> pushmark s
b  <#> gv[*hash] s
c  <1> rv2hv[t4] lK/1
d  <0> pushmark s
e  <#> gv[*_] s
f  <1> rv2av[t2] lKRM*/1
g  <2> aassign[t5] lKS/COMMON
h  <2> lslice vK/2
i  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC
-e syntax OK

Array slice:

$ perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e'@{[@_=%hash]}[1|rand@_]'
1  <0> enter 
2  <;> nextstate(main 2 -e:1) v:{
3  <0> pushmark s
4  <$> const[IV 1] s
5  <#> gv[*_] s
6  <1> rv2av[t8] sK/1
7  <1> rand[t9] sK/1
8  <2> bit_or[t10] sK
9  <0> pushmark s
a  <0> pushmark s
b  <#> gv[*hash] s
c  <1> rv2hv[t4] lK/1
d  <0> pushmark s
e  <#> gv[*_] s
f  <1> rv2av[t2] lKRM*/1
g  <2> aassign[t5] lKS/COMMON
h  <@> anonlist sK*/1
i  <1> rv2av[t6] sKR/1
j  <@> aslice vK
k  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC
-e syntax OK

Array element:

$ perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e'[@_=%hash]->[1|rand@_]'
1  <0> enter 
2  <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{
3  <0> pushmark s
4  <0> pushmark s
5  <#> gv[*hash] s
6  <1> rv2hv[t4] lK/1
7  <0> pushmark s
8  <#> gv[*_] s
9  <1> rv2av[t2] lKRM*/1
a  <2> aassign[t5] lKS/COMMON
b  <@> anonlist sK*/1
c  <1> rv2av[t10] sKR/1
d  <$> const[IV 1] s
e  <#> gv[*_] s
f  <1> rv2av[t7] sK/1
g  <1> rand[t8] sK/1
h  <2> bit_or[t9] sK
i  <2> aelem vK/2
j  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC
-e syntax OK
share|improve this answer
    
Please see updated question –  Zaid Dec 19 '11 at 5:50
    
@Zaid: updated answer –  ysth Dec 19 '11 at 9:49
    
Please decipher O::Concise output –  Zaid Dec 19 '11 at 11:53

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