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I have practically no experience with programming outside of ide's (Microsoft Visual Studio, netbeans and eclipse) and I am beginning to learn C programming. I have adequate experience with C++ and Java. I have downloaded gVim 7.3 and am looking for some guidance on how to program in C with vim. I do not even know where to type code with vim! I am completely lost and am looking for instructions to run simple command-line programs such as hello-world (to start). Also, would notepad++ be of any use? Somebody please show me the world of C programming and Vim

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closed as not a real question by Tim Cooper, Enrico Pallazzo, Zsolt Botykai, Benoit, Michael Berkowski Dec 18 '11 at 22:37

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
These are text editors. You have to associate your C compiler with them. –  kol Dec 18 '11 at 19:29
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This seems like a very broad question, so I'm voting to close. The major gotcha for new users to vim are the different modes, which is why you're finding it hard to type in something. Just do a search for beginner vim tutorials. Expect to start out very slow, with not much productivity. If you're not willing to make that adjustment, I would say stick with something more simple like Notepad++. –  Tim Cooper Dec 18 '11 at 19:29
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I hope this helps: thegeekstuff.com/2009/01/… –  sica07 Dec 18 '11 at 19:30
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Are you using Windows or Linux? If you're using Linux, you should already have GCC (for a compiler). –  BryceAtNetwork23 Dec 18 '11 at 19:33
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Is it worth learning to use Vim? –  CodeKingPlusPlus Dec 18 '11 at 19:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Usually its done like this - you open up a shell window, set your compile enviroment configuration. Then open any files you are working on with gvim to have a C syntax highlighting available, modify them and save. Get back to shell window repeat make command or whatever you need to compile and link application.

The usefull extension for me was ctags, which allows to browse declarations. You dont get the comfort of code completions, intelissence, on-the-fly error messages or list of function parameters, but I didnt miss that much eitherway.

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