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I have an alphabetical index that when clicked unhides a div that contains it's content.

Here is the HTML so I can explain properly:

<ul class="index">
    <li>A</li>
    <li>B</li>
    <li>C</li>
</ul>

<div id="index-A" class="hide">A contents</div>
<div id="index-B" class="hide">B contents</div>
<div id="index-C" class="hide">C contents</div>

When a letter is clicked, I want to unhide it's content div and also hide any other ones that are visible.

How could I do that?

Here is what I have been trying, but am stuck at this point:

$('.index li').click(function(e) {
    // somehow reference the content div using: "index-" + $(this).text()
});
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Sounds like you are looking for this:

$('.index li').click(function(e) {
   var div =  $('#index-'+  $(this).text()).show();
   div.siblings('div').hide();
});

You can see a working example here: http://jsfiddle.net/ktsfs/1/

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I like Martin's solution, but if you're using HTML5 it'd be nice to define the relationship between the links and their content in HTML rather than in Javascript:

<ul class="index">
    <li data-show="#index-A">A</li>
    <li data-show="#index-B">B</li>
    <li data-show="#index-C">C</li>
</ul>

<div id="index-A" class="hide">A contents</div>
<div id="index-B" class="hide">B contents</div>
<div id="index-C" class="hide">C contents</div>

Javascript:

$(".index li").click(function(e) {
   var div = $($(this).data("show")).show();
   div.siblings("div").hide();
});
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+1 an elegant solution –  mmmshuddup Dec 18 '11 at 20:00
    
@Jesper, thanks for the edit, that's what I get for copy-and-pasting! –  Andrew Marshall Dec 18 '11 at 20:08
    
+1 This is a better solution, I was lazy and just gave the OP what he asked for. I'd omit the #'s from the data-show values tho since it doesn't belong there, but in the js imo. –  Martin Jespersen Dec 18 '11 at 20:30
    
@MartinJespersen Yea I was debating where to put them. One argument for putting them in the data attribute is that you could want to tie it to a class rather than ID, but I could go either way. –  Andrew Marshall Dec 18 '11 at 20:51

Very simply:

$('.index li').click(function(e) {
  $('div.hide').hide();
  $('#index-' +  $(this).text()).show();
});
share|improve this answer

Try something like this:

Give each of your index items a class for the letter you wish it to reference:

<ul class="index">
    <li class="A">A</li>
    <li class="B">B</li>
    <li class="C">C</li>
</ul>

<div id="index-contents">
    <div id="index-A" class="hide">A contents</div>
    <div id="index-B" class="hide">B contents</div>
    <div id="index-C" class="hide">C contents</div>
</div>

And then you can find/show the index contents with:

$('.index li').click(function(e) {
    // Hide all
    $('#index-contents .hide').hide();
    // Find the class of the clicked index item
    var index = $(this).attr('class');
    // Show the index's contents
    $('#index-contents').children('#index-'+index).show();
});

http://jsfiddle.net/uS4Cs/1/

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Demo http://jsfiddle.net/CzzG8/

$('.index li').click(function(e) {
    var targetDiv = "#index-" + $(this).text();
    $('div').show();
    $(targetDiv).hide();
});
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