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I'm solving the python koans. I haven't got any real problem until the 34th.

this is the problem:

Project: Create a Proxy Class

In this assignment, create a proxy class (one is started for you below). You should be able to initialize the proxy object with any object. Any attributes called on the proxy object should be forwarded to the target object. As each attribute call is sent, the proxy should record the name of the attribute sent.

The proxy class is started for you. You will need to add a method missing handler and any other supporting methods. The specification of the Proxy class is given in the AboutProxyObjectProject koan.

Note: This is a bit trickier that it's Ruby Koans counterpart, but you can do it!

and this is my solution until now:

class Proxy(object):
    def __init__(self, target_object):
        self._count = {}
        #initialize '_obj' attribute last. Trust me on this!
        self._obj = target_object

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):pass


    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        if attr in self._count: 
            self._count[attr]+=1
        else: 
            self._count[attr]=1
        return getattr(self._obj, attr)

    def messages(self):
        return self._count.keys()

    def was_called(self, attr):
        if attr in self._count:
            return True
        else: False

    def number_of_times_called(self, attr):
        if attr in self._count:
            return self._count[attr]
        else: return False

It works until this test:

def test_proxy_records_messages_sent_to_tv(self):
    tv = Proxy(Television())

    tv.power()
    tv.channel = 10

    self.assertEqual(['power', 'channel='], tv.messages())

where tv.messages() is ['power'] because tv.channel=10 is taken by the proxy object and not the television object.
I've tried to manipulate the __setattr__ method, but I always end in a unlimited loop.

edit 1:

I'm trying this:

def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        if hasattr(self, name):
            object.__setattr__(self,name,value)
        else: 
            object.__setattr__(self._obj, name, value)

But then I get this error in a loop on the last entry:

RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded while calling a Python object


File "/home/kurojishi/programmi/python_koans/python 2/koans/about_proxy_object_project.py", line 60, in test_proxy_method_returns_wrapped_object
tv = Proxy(Television())                                                                                                                                     
File "/home/kurojishi/programmi/python_koans/python 2/koans/about_proxy_object_project.py", line 25, in __init__                                               
self._count = {}                                                                                                                                             
File "/home/kurojishi/programmi/python_koans/python 2/koans/about_proxy_object_project.py", line 33, in __setattr__                                            
object.__setattr__(self._obj, name, value)                                                                                                                   
File "/home/kurojishi/programmi/python_koans/python 2/koans/about_proxy_object_project.py", line 36, in __getattr__                                            
if attr in self._count:      

The loop is in __getattr__.

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is the posted error complete ? what the exception is ? –  joaquin Dec 18 '11 at 21:32
    
sorry this is just a little of the error. the error loop on the last entry the exception is 'RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded while calling a Python object' –  kurojishi Dec 18 '11 at 21:33
    
did you get the chance to try my hint? –  Frederick Roth Sep 1 '12 at 7:32
    
sadly no, i was a intense exame session i belive i'll have the time after september :) –  kurojishi Sep 1 '12 at 11:14
    
good luck with the exams! –  Frederick Roth Sep 1 '12 at 11:47

6 Answers 6

As I understand maybe your problem is related with the recursive call when you set and attribute value. From docs:

If __setattr__() wants to assign to an instance attribute, it should not simply execute "self.name = value" -- this would cause a recursive call to itself. Instead, it should insert the value in the dictionary of instance attributes, e.g., "self.__dict__[name] = value". For new-style classes, rather than accessing the instance dictionary, it should call the base class method with the same name, for example, "object.__setattr__(self, name, value)".

share|improve this answer
    
edited with an initial idea using that methods. not working though –  kurojishi Dec 18 '11 at 21:07

You are using hasattr in __setattr__ to decide whether you should write to the local or proxied object. This works well for all but one case.

In your __init__ you have the following line:

  self._count = {}

This calls __setattr__ with '_count' which does not exist at that point and therefore (hence hasattr returns False) is forwarded to the proxied object.

If you want to use your approach you have to write your __init__ like this:

def __init__(self, target_object):
    object.__setattr__(self, '_count', {})
    #initialize '_obj' attribute last. Trust me on this!
    object.__setattr__(self, '_obj', target_object)
share|improve this answer
    
thanks this seems to be a good solution, i'll try it in the first slice of freetime, thanks, same for the others, i've been very busy and i could not try the last ones, i'll check them as soon as possible, many thanks –  kurojishi Jun 20 '12 at 11:48
    
Glad to help :) –  Frederick Roth Jun 27 '12 at 12:46
    
did you have time to check? ;) –  Frederick Roth May 7 '13 at 21:36
    
i'm slowing redoing all the koans(left the complete one home changing country and the pc was cut from the network). i'll arrive to it :) –  kurojishi May 8 '13 at 1:41

setattr is called on all assignments. It's more like getattribute than getattr. This also affects code in the __init__ method.

This means that the first branch of this code will almost always fail, only attributes inherited from object will pass the test:

def __setattr__(self, name, value):
    if hasattr(self, name):
        object.__setattr__(self,name,value)
    else: 
        object.__setattr__(self._obj, name, value)

Instead we can assume that assignments are meant for the Proxy unless it has an _obj attribute. Hence the comment in __init__. We set up our proxy's attributes, then add the target object and all future assignments get sent to it.

def __setattr__(self, name, value):
    if hasattr(self, '_obj'):
        object.__setattr__(self._obj, name, value)
    else:
        object.__setattr__(self, name, value)

But by using hasattr we would also need to alter __getattr__ to check for _obj to prevent recursion:

def __getattr__(self, name):
    if '_obj' == name:
        raise AttributeError

    if attr in self._count: 
        self._count[attr]+=1
    else: 
        self._count[attr]=1
    return getattr(self._obj, attr)

An alternative would be to inspect the proxy's __dict__ attribute directly in the __setattr__ method:

def __setattr__(self, name, value):
    if '_obj' in self.__dict__:
    ...
share|improve this answer

from the test, it is a requirement for proxy to log all the attribute calls via proxy. And the proxy has only few built-in methods which are exceptionally used for logging, so my answer was:

class Proxy(object):

    def __init__(self, target_object):
        self.logs=[]
        self._obj = target_object


    def __getattribute__(self, attrname):
        if attrname in ['_obj','logs','messages','was_called','number_of_times_called'] :
            return object.__getattribute__(self, attrname)
        else:
            self.logs.append(attrname)
            return object.__getattribute__((object.__getattribute__(self, '_obj')), attrname)


    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        if hasattr(self, '_obj'):
            self.logs.append(name)
            object.__setattr__(object.__getattribute__(self,'_obj'), name, value)
        else :
            object.__setattr__(self, name, value)

After this it is quite easy to implement other methods ('messages', 'was_called', ... )

Sorry for necro'ing old question.

and I found out that getattribute can be changed : just check whether the attribute is in the target object.

def __getattribute__(self, attrname):
        if attrname not in dir(object.__getattribute__(self, '_obj')):
            return object.__getattribute__(self, attrname)
        else:
            self.logs.append(attrname)
            return object.__getattribute__((object.__getattribute__(self, '_obj')), attrname)
share|improve this answer
    
thanks no prob with necroposting :) –  kurojishi Oct 9 '12 at 10:19
class Proxy(object):
   """Proxy class wraps any other class, and adds functionality to remember and report all messages called.
Limitations include that proxy blocks all direct subclass calls to:
messages, number_of_times_called, was_called, _obj, and _message_counts.
These calls must be made directly like my_proxy_instance._obj.messages.
"""


def __init__(self, target_object):
    print 'initializing a proxy for ' + target_object.__class__.__name__
    # WRITE CODE HERE
    self._message_counts = Counter();
    #initialize '_obj' attribute last. Trust me on this!
    self._obj = target_object

# WRITE CODE HERE                                   
def  __getattr__(self, attr_name):
    print 'getting an attribute: "' + attr_name + '" from "' + self._obj.__class__.__name__  + '"'
    self._message_counts[attr_name] += 1
    print self._message_counts
    return object.__getattribute__(self._obj, attr_name)

#def __getattribute__(self, attr_name):
#    print "intercepted!~ " + attr_name
#    object.__getattribute__(self, attr_name)

def __setattr__(self, attr_name, value):
    if((attr_name == '_obj') | (attr_name == '_message_counts')): # special proxy attributes.
        print 'setting the PROXY attribute: "' + attr_name + '"'
        object.__setattr__(self, attr_name, value)
    else:
        print 'setting the REAL attribute: "' + attr_name + '"'
        self._message_counts[attr_name+"="] += 1
        object.__setattr__(self._obj, attr_name, value)

def messages(self):
    return self._message_counts.keys()

def number_of_times_called(self, attr_name):
    return self._message_counts[attr_name]

def was_called(self, attr_name):
    return attr_name in self._message_counts
share|improve this answer

What I did was take all the calls to attributes in the proxy and call them via object.__getattribute__ to avoid recursion.

That did not work for methods so I wrapped the method calls in a try..except AttributeError to try them first in the proxy. and then if they raise an error try them in the child object.

If anyone has a more elegant solution would love to see it.

from runner.koan import *
from collections import Counter

class Proxy(object):
    def __init__(self, target_object):
        self._messages=[]
        self._obj = target_object

    def messages(self):
        return self._messages

    def was_called(self, message):
        return message in self._messages

    def number_of_times_called(self, message):
        _count = Counter(self._messages).get(message)
        if _count: 
            return _count
        else: # catch None
            return 0

    def __getattribute__(self, attr_name):
        try: # call on self
            retval = object.__getattribute__(self, attr_name)
        except AttributeError: # call on child object
            retval = self._obj.__getattribute__(attr_name)
            object.__getattribute__(self, '_messages').append(attr_name)

        return retval

    def __setattr__(self, attr_name, attr_value):
        if hasattr(self, '_obj'): # call child object and log message
            self._obj.__setattr__(attr_name, attr_value)
            attr_name += "="
            object.__getattribute__(self, '_messages').append(attr_name)
        else: # use this before_obj is set in __init__
            object.__setattr__(self, attr_name, attr_value)

    def messages(self):
        return self._messages


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