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So in the database, there's a table named roles_users. This holds all the roles that the users have. Here, there's two columns: user_id, role_id.

A normal user, with no extra roles has 1 row in this table. This row has role_id 1.

A admin user, has 2 rows in this table. One with role_id 1, and one row with role_id 2

Like this:

user_id  role_id
88       1 
88       2 
99       1 // Only one row with that user_id, so he's a user

Now im trying to count how many users/admin/sellers/partners that exists.

Sellers have 3 rows, one with role_id 1, role_id 2 and role_id 3.

Partner has role_id 1, role_id 4

So i tried this:

SELECT user_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id IN (1) // MEMBERS ONLY
SELECT user_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id IN (1,2) // ADMIN
SELECT user_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id IN (1,2,3) // SELLER
SELECT user_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id IN (1,4) // PARTNERS

But these queries does not work properly. They give me a count that is way over than its supposed to be. And i believe this is because that it does not EXCLUDE any rows,

I mean at the query when it should look for role_id 1, for members, it includes partners,admin,sellers too because it only check for if it theres any with the row role_id 1 and thats it.

So how can i do this right? So when it looks after members, it should also make sure that the user_id does not have any more rows with other role_ids like 2,3,4

share|improve this question
    
Try select distinct user_Id – Sparky Dec 18 '11 at 20:27
    
The relational operator you require is division, popularly known as "the supplier who supplies all parts". Suggested reading here, here and here. – onedaywhen Dec 19 '11 at 9:24

group_concat is what you want:

select
    case roles
        when '1' then 'members'
        when '1,2' then 'admins'
        when '1,2,3' then 'sellers'
        when '1,4' then 'partners'
        else 'uh??'
    end role,
    count(user_id) nr_users from (
        select user_id, group_concat(role_id order by role_id separator ',') roles
        from roles_users
        group by user_id
    )
group by role
order by role;

And by the way, you could store roles more efficiently using a bitmask. Advantage: only one column per user id. Disadvantage: harder to build queries...

share|improve this answer
    
I like this. But would you need an order by role_id in your inner query to ensure the string returned is always the same (ie '1,2,3' and not '3,1,2')? – Glenn Dec 18 '11 at 20:51
    
It is in the group_concat statement itself that it is ordered before it is grouped by. – fge Dec 18 '11 at 20:53
    
Right, sorry, didn't catch that. That is a nice solution. I wish Oracle had a function like that. – Glenn Dec 18 '11 at 20:56
    
Oracle has wm_concat, but I don't know whether you can order by in it. – fge Dec 18 '11 at 21:01

This will give you all combinations of privileges in the table with their count

SELECT 
    COUNT(*) AS num
    GROUP_CONCAT(role_id ORDER BY role_id) AS privilegeset
FROM roles_users
GROUP BY user_id
share|improve this answer
    
Uh! Does that really work? Care to explain the logic behind this? – fge Dec 18 '11 at 20:55

Concerning sellers and partners:
As I understand it, sellers are the only ones that can have role_id = 3 and partners are the only ones that can have role_id = 4, correct?

If yes, finding sellers and partners is quite easy:

SELECT user_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id = 3 // SELLER
SELECT user_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id = 4 // PARTNERS
share|improve this answer

Not the most elegant, but a start

SELECT user_id
      ,CASE WHEN (role1 > 0 AND 0 = role2 AND 0 = role3 AND 0 = role4) THEN 'MEMBER'
        WHEN (role1 > 0 AND role2 > 0 AND 0 = role3 AND 0 = role4) THEN 'ADMIN'
        WHEN (role1 > 0 AND role2 > 0  AND role3 > 0 AND 0 = role4) THEN 'SELLER'
        WHEN (role1 > 0 AND 0 = role2 AND 0 = role3 AND role4 > 0) THEN 'PARTNER'
        ELSE 'Something else'
       END AS type
  FROM (
    SELECT user_id
          ,SUM( CASE role_id WHEN 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS role1
          ,SUM( CASE role_id WHEN 2 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS role2
          ,SUM( CASE role_id WHEN 3 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS role3
          ,SUM( CASE role_id WHEN 4 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS role4
      FROM roles_users
      GROUP BY user_id
    ) x

EDIT: I guess this is answering the wrong question, it is showing the type of each user.

share|improve this answer

Here's a solution using INTERSECT and MINUS. Sadly these are not supported by MySQL yet but maybe someone will find this useful nonetheless.

-- Find users with Role 1

SELECT user_id FROM  
 (SELECT user_id, role_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id = 1) 
MINUS SELECT user_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id NOT IN (1)

-- Find users with Roles 1 and 2

SELECT user_id FROM
 (SELECT user_id, role_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id = 1
  INTERSECT SELECT user_id, role_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id = 2)
MINUS SELECT user_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id NOT IN (1,2)

-- Find users with Roles 1, 2, 3

SELECT user_id FROM
 (SELECT user_id, role_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id = 1
  INTERSECT SELECT user_id, role_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id = 2
  INTERSECT SELECT user_id, role_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id = 3)
MINUS SELECT user_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id NOT IN (1,2,3)

-- Find users with Roles 1, 4

SELECT user_id FROM
 (SELECT user_id, role_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id = 1
  INTERSECT SELECT user_id, role_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id = 4)
MINUS SELECT user_id FROM roles_users WHERE role_id NOT IN (1,4)
share|improve this answer

Here's a join-based solution that hopefully works on any SQL.

SELECT user_id FROM roles_users RU0
LEFT JOIN roles_users RU1 ON RU0.user_id = RU1.user_id AND RU1.role_id = 1
LEFT JOIN roles_users RU2 ON RU0.user_id = RU2.user_id AND RU2.role_id = 2
LEFT JOIN roles_users RU3 ON RU0.user_id = RU3.user_id AND RU3.role_id = 3
LEFT JOIN roles_users RU4 ON RU0.user_id = RU4.user_id AND RU4.role_id = 4
WHERE RU1.user_id IS NOT NULL -- should have role 1
  AND RU2.user_id IS NULL     -- should NOT have role 2
  AND RU3.user_id IS NULL     -- should NOT have role 3
  AND RU4.user_id IS NOT NULL -- should have role 4

Just vary the "IS NULL" and "IS NOT NULL" in the where clause to change which roles you want the user to have or not have.

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