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I wish to do a special type of scaling for my data.

Is it possible to query a database which has the following ints in a column:

10
5
5
3
1
1
0
1
5
2
2

And produce the following representation via a query:

1.0
0.8
0.8
0.6
0.2
0.2
0.0
1.0
0.8
0.4
0.4

So the max value becomes 1.0 and 0 remains as 0. Then we have the set of unique values excluding 0, which is 10, 5, 3, 2, 1. The length of this set is 5. The inverse is 0.2. Then the next largest value in our column, 5, become 1 - 0.2 = 0.8. Then the next largest value, 3, becomes 0.8-0.2 = 0.6, and so on.

10->1.0, 5->0.8, 3->0.6, 2->0.4, 1->0.2, 0->0

Or would you recommend that the programming language doing the query should instead perfom this scaling.

I'm the only one who will be quering the database and I haven't chosen my database yet, but will be using one that is open-source or SQL-Server. This type is scaling is very important for my application and I will be using it on different tables. I will be programming in Python3.

EDIT: SQL Server is also an option, as well as open source dbs

share|improve this question
    
Oh that MySQL supported ranking functions! –  Andriy M Dec 18 '11 at 21:03
    
It might be easier done on the client side but using SQL Server, my plan of attack would be to get the 1/COUNT(DISTINCT ID) to get a Set value and use a ranking function to attach a Set value to an ID. I don't know if MySQL has similar functions. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Dec 18 '11 at 21:04
    
You've tagged this SQL-Server, but that's very much Not open source... –  MatBailie Dec 18 '11 at 22:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would recommend PHP:

$myColumnArray = /* load mysql values here */;   
// order numbers smallest to largest
$uniqueElements = sort(array_unique($myColumnArray));
// calculate increment
$incriment = count($uniqueElements);
// go thru elements in orig array and replace with weighted value
foreach($myColumnArray as &$val){
    // get position of element (i.e. "4th largest")
    $position = array_search ($val, $uniqueElements);
    // set it equal to weighted value
    $val = $position * $increment;
}
share|improve this answer
    
PHP is not my cup of thee but it looks like you are taking the entire array count to calculate an increment. You should take the count of the distinct values instead. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Dec 18 '11 at 21:07
    
good catch! Fixed. –  Tomas Dec 18 '11 at 21:08

I have some trouble understanding you algorithm, but I would advise performing this logic in the programming language. Thats probably more efficient, and easier to maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
10 is more important than 5, but not twice as important in my case, hence the type of scaling I'm using. –  Baz Dec 18 '11 at 21:25

Please give this a good testing before pronouncing it viable:

SELECT
  Value,
  rnk / cnt AS WhatYouCallIt
FROM (
  SELECT
    @rank := @rank + (t.Value <> @prev) AS rnk,
    @prev := t.Value AS Value,
    m.cnt
  FROM atable t,
    (SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT Value) AS cnt FROM atable WHERE Value > 0) m
    (SELECT @prev := 0, @rank = 0) x
  WHERE t.Value >= 0
) s
share|improve this answer

SQL Server, Oracle, etc, have access to analytic functions such as RANK(). These functions make such problems very manageable. I'm not aware of an open source RDBMS that can do this though. (If you advise of the specific RDBMS you're using, and it has access to RANK(), I can show you how I'd approach it.)

Without such analytic functions, you're best advised to do this in your client code.


First, you need to know how many distinct values there are, and what they are.

SELECT x FROM yourTable GROUP BY x ORDER BY x

Once you have an array of these values, it's a simple look-up. For each element in your result set, check what position the value occupies in your look-up table. Then you have your result.

share|improve this answer
    
I have access to SQL-Server. –  Baz Dec 19 '11 at 16:03

An attempt with pure SQL - without analytic functions:

SELECT
      t.col             AS oldvalue
    , tr.rank / tc.cnt  AS newvalue
FROM 
        tableX AS t
    JOIN
        ( SELECT
                t1.col
              , COUNT(*) - 1  AS rank
          FROM
                  ( SELECT DISTINCT col
                    FROM tableX
                  ) AS t1
              JOIN
                  ( SELECT DISTINCT col
                    FROM tableX
                  ) AS t2
                ON t2.col <= t1.col
          GROUP BY t1.col
        ) AS tr
      ON tr.col = t.col
    CROSS JOIN
        ( SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT col) - 1  AS cnt
          FROM tableX
        ) AS tc
share|improve this answer

I think this should work as I actually don't have any 0's in this column. How can I optimize this sql server code?

SELECT 
count, 
dense_rank() over(order by count) / CONVERT ( float, (SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT count) FROM db))   
FROM db

Thanks!

share|improve this answer

A pure SQL solution. I would suggest MySQL for this because session variables make this type of query a little bit easier.

SELECT
   t.id AS 'original_value',
   IF(st.rank IS NULL, 0.0, ((1.0 / st3.group_size) * (st3.group_size - st.rank + 1))) AS 'adjusted_values'
FROM
   test t
LEFT JOIN (
   SELECT
     st1.id AS 'value',
     @rank := @rank + 1 AS 'rank'
   FROM
     (SELECT @rank := 0) vars,
     (SELECT DISTINCT id FROM test WHERE id <> 0 ORDER BY id DESC) st1) st ON t.id = st.value
INNER JOIN (
   SELECT
      1 AS 'group_by',
      COUNT(*) AS 'group_size'
   FROM
      (SELECT DISTINCT id FROM test WHERE id <> 0 ORDER BY id DESC) st2
   GROUP BY group_by) st3;

With your inputs it would yield:

original_value    adjusted_values
--------------    ---------------
0                 0
1                 0.2
2                 0.4
3                 0.6
5                 0.8
10                 1
5                 0.8
1                 0.2
1                 0.2
5                 0.8
2                 0.4
share|improve this answer

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