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Most of the time this transaction takes <1s, average of 200ms or so. But occasionally, it takes >4s! This sproc gets run 5-6 times per second or so.

My sproc is pretty simple (innoDB - REPEATABLE READ):

START TRANSACTION;
SELECT end_time INTO currentEndTime FROM auctions WHERE id=var_auction_id;

IF (ADDTIME(currentEndTime  , var_time_increment) < NOW()) THEN
  UPDATE auctions SET end_time = ADDTIME(NOW(), var_time_increment), price = price+var_price_increment, leader_id = var_leader_id, modified = NOW() WHERE id = var_auction_id AND closed = 0;
ELSE
  UPDATE auctions SET end_time = ADDTIME(end_time, var_time_increment), price = price+var_price_increment, leader_id = var_leader_id, modified = NOW() WHERE id = var_auction_id AND closed = 0;
END IF;
SELECT ROW_COUNT() INTO myRowCount;

IF (_error) THEN
  ROLLBACK;
ELSE
  SET var_return = myRowCount;
  COMMIT;
END IF;

I want to figure out what's causing the 4s spikes, things I have tried:

  1. I thought it might be concurrent, but I've seen this sproc called 5 times in 1 second, and those transactions take <100ms. And for the 4s ones, it's not that many concurrent transactions

  2. Index is set properly on id

  3. Table is small... 4000 rows or so.

  4. Can't really run slow query log since it's MySQL 5.0, want to avoid rebooting the server to turn on the slow query flag unless it's the last resort.

I need some suggestions on the cause or what else to investigate.

share|improve this question
    
Is the server where you run that queries heavily loaded? What does uptime or top commands show? or the task manager? (depending on the OS) –  Frosty Z Dec 18 '11 at 21:07
    
This is the top information: top - load average: 0.97, 0.89, 0.91 Tasks: 201 total, 3 running, 198 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie Cpu(s): 21.7%us, 1.5%sy, 0.0%ni, 76.4%id, 0.0%wa, 0.2%hi, 0.2%si, 0.0%st –  Kyra Dec 18 '11 at 21:31
1  
Does not looks overloaded, strange... Maybe try with adding an index on both fields id+closed, matching exactly the UPDATE's WHERE criteria? Additionally, what gives a free -m? –  Frosty Z Dec 18 '11 at 22:36
1  
You may also check that your MySQL settings are optimized for InnoDB (default settings for 5.0 are good for MyISAM but usually not that good for InnoDB use). You can start here: mysqlperformanceblog.com/2007/11/01/… –  ypercube Dec 19 '11 at 0:19
1  
What is the primary key on the table? How large is the innodb buffer pool? You might be running into the innodb stalls during a checkpoint. Monitor the output of show innodb status when you are having trouble. –  The Scrum Meister Dec 19 '11 at 0:19

1 Answer 1

Not sure if this will help but these lines:

SELECT end_time INTO currentEndTime FROM auctions WHERE id = var_auction_id;

IF (ADDTIME(currentEndTime, var_time_increment) < NOW()) THEN
    UPDATE auctions 
    SET end_time = ADDTIME(NOW(), var_time_increment)
      , price = price + var_price_increment
      , leader_id = var_leader_id
      , modified = NOW() 
    WHERE id = var_auction_id 
    AND closed = 0;
ELSE
    UPDATE auctions 
    SET end_time = ADDTIME(end_time, var_time_increment) 
      , price = price+var_price_increment
      , leader_id = var_leader_id
      , modified = NOW() 
    WHERE id = var_auction_id 
      AND closed = 0;
END IF;

can be rewritten as:

    UPDATE auctions 
    SET end_time 
        = ADDTIME( CASE WHEN ADDTIME(end_time, var_time_increment) < NOW()
                        THEN NOW()
                        ELSE end_time
                   END
                 , var_time_increment
                 ) 
      , price = price + var_price_increment
      , leader_id = var_leader_id
      , modified = NOW() 
    WHERE id = var_auction_id 
      AND closed = 0;

or:

    UPDATE auctions 
    SET end_time 
        = ADDTIME( CASE WHEN end_time < ADDTIME(NOW(), - var_time_increment)
                        THEN NOW()
                        ELSE end_time
                   END
                 , var_time_increment
                 ) 
      , price = price + var_price_increment
      , leader_id = var_leader_id
      , modified = NOW() 
    WHERE id = var_auction_id 
      AND closed = 0;

A compound index on (closed, id) should also help the UPDATE statement to avoid reading from the table when closed <> 0.

share|improve this answer
    
if the id is the primary key, a compound index won't help. If it is not the primary key, then the table needs a redesign. –  The Scrum Meister Dec 19 '11 at 0:26
    
@TheScrumMeister: Why will it not help (in the case that id is PK)? The condition id = var_auction_id AND closed = 0 means the query has to read the table if there is no compound index. –  ypercube Dec 19 '11 at 0:29
    
id is indeed the primary key. I ran an explain on the update statement (with select), and it seems to be reading from index. –  Kyra Dec 19 '11 at 0:41
    
@ypercube, do you mind explaining the potential benefit of your suggestion? Don't think I understand it. If multiple clients run this transaction, won't only 1 of them be able to set close = 0 and the other ones won't be able to write closed and therefore no wasted reads? Am I missing something? Thanks!! –  Kyra Dec 19 '11 at 0:52
    
My (rewriting) suggestion has nothing to do with how closed is used or changed. It only means to avoid the first SELECT which only fetches end_time. –  ypercube Dec 19 '11 at 0:57

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