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I can't seem to understand why when I use println method on the quarter object, it returns the value of the toString method. I never called the toString method why am I getting the return value?

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Quarter q = new Quarter();
        Nickel n = new Nickel();
        System.out.println(q);
        System.out.println(n);
    }
}

public abstract class Money {
    private int value;

    public Money(int v) {
        value=v;
    }

    public abstract int getValue();

    protected int myValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public abstract String toString();
}

public abstract class Coin extends Money {
    public Coin(int value) {
        super(value);
        System.out.println("I am a coin, my value is " + getValue());
    }
}

public class Quarter extends Coin {
    public Quarter () {
        super(25);
    }

    public int getValue() {
        return myValue();
    }

    public String toString() {
        return "A Quarter is "+getValue();
    }
}

public class Nickel extends Coin {
    public Nickel () {
        super(5);
    }

    public int getValue() {
        return myValue();
    }

    public String toString() {
        return "A "+this.getClass().getName()+ " is "+getValue();
    }
}
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what do you suppose the string representation of your quarter object is? You cant just tell java to print your object. –  Mead3000 Dec 18 '11 at 23:50
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4 Answers 4

Because PrintStream.println has an overload that takes an Object, and then calls its toString method.

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Because this is how this function operates: it formats the primitive types for you, but when you pass it an object, it will call .toString() on it.

If you don't override it, it will output the default .toString() implementation (Class@somenumber) which is not really useful...

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Oh I see! I never knew that. So if I pass an object in the arguments of the println method I will call the tostring method of that object by default. It does not seem to be useful and it contradicts what I learn about "you don't use a method unless you call it". But thanks for the info about println method. It seems rather sneaky for the println method to call the tostring method like that. –  Nicholas Kong Dec 18 '11 at 23:55
    
@NicholasKong: "You don't use a method unless you call it"; this is only true for non-override methods. toString is an override of a base-class method, and so may be invoked by things that take a reference to the base class. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 18 '11 at 23:57
    
Well, maybe you prefer the C version which tries and prints everything as a 0-terminated char *? :p –  fge Dec 18 '11 at 23:58
    
Okay Thanks everyone! overridden methods such as toString gets call no matter! i will bear in mind. –  Nicholas Kong Dec 19 '11 at 0:01
    
No, don't jump to conclusions like that. Like @OliCharlesworth says, the real reason is because System.out is a PrintStream, and when the print() method of this class is called with an Object as an argument, it will actually print the result of this object's .toString() method. Now, your object may or may not override .toString(). –  fge Dec 19 '11 at 0:04
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When you are directly trying to print an object, by default it will call the toString method you need to override that toString method to print the attributes of your class.

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On Refering to java docs what i undestand is that,

When you call PrintStream class print(obj) / println(obj) method then internally it called write method with arguement as String.valueOf(obj) shown below :

public void print(Object obj) {
    write(String.valueOf(obj));
}

Now String.valueOf(obj) does the task of calling to String method as shown below :

 /**
 * Returns the string representation of the <code>Object</code> argument.
 *
 * @param   obj   an <code>Object</code>.
 * @return  if the argument is <code>null</code>, then a string equal to
 *          <code>"null"</code>; otherwise, the value of
 *          <code>obj.toString()</code> is returned.
 * @see     java.lang.Object#toString()
 */
public static String valueOf(Object obj) {
return (obj == null) ? "null" : obj.toString();
}
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